An update

Some of you know that I spent this summer in San Diego with a semi-pro summer league team named the Mavericks. Throughout the first half of the summer, I struggled greatly with my control. Although I never once hit a batter, I found throwing strikes difficult. I felt conditional pain the day after I pitched usually and eventually, I wouldn’t even have to throw hard, 10-15 flat ground throws would do it, and I would feel conditional pain the next day. That was it. I decided to see a doctor and I had an MRI to find out that I micro tears, tendonitis, and a posterior labrum tear. The doctor said that if I rest for awhile and do rehab work, I should be fine. Another player on my summer team also had a posterior labrum tear when he was 19 (I’m 20) and he had surgery. Now, he is a pretty good pitcher. Anyways, my plan now is to do exercises till October then begin a throwing program. I’m going to see a physical therapist when I get back home to Oklahoma.

That’s that.

Edit: The pain started in early May so I started the summer with it but it wasn’t very bad. I did not think I would have such a problem.

Really sorry to hear the news, Spencer. :frowning: I wish you the best of luck with your rehab.

One tip I can offer is to make sure you work on scapular range of motion and flexibility. If the scap can’t move through its complete range of motion, then more stress is placed on the shoulder joint including things like the labrum and rotator cuff.

[quote=“Roger”]Really sorry to hear the new, Spencer. :frowning: I wish you the best of luck with your rehab.

One tip I can offer is to make sure you work on scapular range of motion and flexibility. If the scap can’t move through its complete range of motion, then more stress is placed on the shoulder joint including things like the labrum and rotator cuff.[/quote]
What would you do to stretch that?

Thats a tough break, Spencer. Good luck on your rehab, and keep us up to date, will you?

Hose

[quote=“3and0”][quote=“Roger”]Really sorry to hear the new, Spencer. :frowning: I wish you the best of luck with your rehab.

One tip I can offer is to make sure you work on scapular range of motion and flexibility. If the scap can’t move through its complete range of motion, then more stress is placed on the shoulder joint including things like the labrum and rotator cuff.[/quote]
What would you do to stretch that?[/quote]

Get one of those inflatable balls that they use for yoga and stuff. Lay on your stomach on the ball and do many different types of scap excercises like the swimming motion, angel wings, etc.

[quote=“MrLee”][quote=“3and0”][quote=“Roger”]Really sorry to hear the new, Spencer. :frowning: I wish you the best of luck with your rehab.

One tip I can offer is to make sure you work on scapular range of motion and flexibility. If the scap can’t move through its complete range of motion, then more stress is placed on the shoulder joint including things like the labrum and rotator cuff.[/quote]
What would you do to stretch that?[/quote]

Get one of those inflatable balls that they use for yoga and stuff. Lay on your stomach on the ball and do many different types of scap excercises like the swimming motion, angel wings, etc.[/quote]
Would swimming work?

With rehab work there should be a progressive monitoring system that allows YOU to FEEL the extent of your rehabilitation … step by step – day by day – week by week… etc.

Your exercise routines should include diet, sleep, non-active shoulder and arms ultra-loads like fungo bat swings, breaststrokes in the pool and similar activity. Also, any exercise plan must be regimented daily and without interruption. You must also be consistent, with the same loads, at the same time of the day, and complete.

Why the concern about regimented consistency? You’re trying to get your body to activate itself BACK from injury. You’re trying to get your body BACK to load bearing. So, consistent expectations by the physical side of your rehab work has to go hand-n-hand with the mental side of rehab work. In fact, if you don’t THINK yourself into planning, executing, then cooling down after a regularly scheduled workout your going to do more harm then good.

Diet plays an immense role here also, along with a healthy sleep regiment. Be consistent here too. Don’t go haphazard. Eat breakfast at the same time, road work at the same time, rehab work at the same time and in the same rep’s, plenty of water and cool down periods.

Then after every scheduled workout, do a test for yourself to see how things are going… physique wise. Try these “tests” in moderation:
 kneel down on your throwing side and reach for a door knob. Your arm should be stretched out. Now turn the door knob GENTLY and slowly to the complete right until it won’t turn no more. You should feel a little discomfort…. NOT PAIN. Don’t force the door knob withany kind of strength… just turn till it stops. Now turn the door knob in the other direction until it stops. Again, you should feel a little discomfort NOT PAIN. If the discomfort lingers after four weeks of rehab work, your body is telling you that your rehab exercise is either too strenuous or your not doing them correctly, or even worse you’ve got the wrong exercise for the wrong reasons.
 always take a hot shower after every workout and then just relax for about two hours at least. Let your body cool down … muscle wise.

These are very simple suggestions that your rehab specialist should be suggesting to you… or maybe something more tailored to your specific
physique.

If your rehab work isn’t working out as planned or to your satisfaction, let the people closest to you know about it. Ask them for bench marks of improvement and “TESTS” that you can do yourself to prove your progress.

I wish you the best with your rehab work and your baseball experience.

Coach B.

Get better, Spencer…very best of luck with your re-hab.

laflippin

What are we gonna do with you?:bothered: :reallyconfused:

Have you talked to your college coach yet? If you have…what are they saying? You know my best thoughts are there for you…you come back with a vengance there buddy, just like I know you will. :allgood:

Oh yeah once you come back ready to throw you’ll be gassing it up. Good luck with everything its only a small bump a lot of good pitchers had trouble while they were younger. I’m sure this will only inspire you to do better.

Best of luck to you.

[quote=“3and0”][quote=“Roger”]Really sorry to hear the new, Spencer. :frowning: I wish you the best of luck with your rehab.

One tip I can offer is to make sure you work on scapular range of motion and flexibility. If the scap can’t move through its complete range of motion, then more stress is placed on the shoulder joint including things like the labrum and rotator cuff.[/quote]
What would you do to stretch that?[/quote]
I’d prefer to leave that up to Spencer’s physical therapist. While I know what needs to be done, I’m not sure how to do it best given Spencer’s condition.

I went to the PT today and he said that tightness is really an indication of weakness in the shoulder. Stretching is not really what you should do, instead you should address the weakness. He did some slight resistance tests and whenever I was not able to resist, he would do some tissue massage/stimulation in a corresponding area. By the end of about 25 minutes, I had gained much of my flexibility back and was able to resist in the force in the tests.

Well all right then!
Come back solid old boy!!

I went to a sports doctor just about 5 days ago, and he made me do some of the same resistance tests. I wasn’t able to resist and he said thats because my rotator cuff is weak. He said it wasn’t keeping my shoulder in place and thats why I was feeling pain when I would release the ball. He said to do strengthening exercises until it has had time to build up and then I could begin throwing again. But I know what you mean about it being weak.

Just to be clear, allowing the scapula to move through its full range of motion prevents the shoulder joint from having to max out its range of motion which would surely test the muscles and tissues that hold the humeral head in the socket. In no way was I suggesting stretching the shoulder joint itself. But you should discuss this with your PT. I’m not a PT.

No problem Roger.

Anyways, I’ve started throwing again (~6 weeks off) and I’ve felt no pain while throwing or the day after. It does however feel awkward throwing. My arm seems to go through a predetermined path and I am unable to be accurate this way. I have not been throwing hard by any means (probably not touching seventy) and I have been forcing my arm and body to do what I want at a slower speeds. I haven’t ever done this before, I’ve always tried to throw ‘hard’. When I ‘force’ my arm path, I am accurate and don’t feel any stretching or looseness, so to speak, in my shoulder.

These observations are based on how my body feels because I haven’t seen it. My explanation for this is that the muscles that have been conditioned to be the prime movers are making my body do the same thing it always has. This means I need to strengthen some different muscles. Go therapy.

I am also keeping a record of throwing, how much, the intensity, and various results/feelings for during and the day after.

That is all for now. Sorry about the wall of text; it is JD’s fault.

I accept the blame for my spawn :roadkill:
Keep us along for the ride… 8)