After throwing distance or short


#1

hey, after long toss or mound work, is long distance running or short agility/sprinting which is most beneficial…

also, once you get blood flow is ice even necessary?


#2

Be prepared for a lot of controversy regarding this subject. Few things will result in knock-down, drag-out arguments as what kind of running and/or how much. So let me get in my 75 cents’ worth (inflation, you know).
I don’t think you need to start running marathons after you’ve finished throwing. A few minutes of sprints—pole to pole, straight across the outfield, should do the trick. 8)


#3

As Zita pointed out, you’ll get all kinds of answers about that, but if you think about it, there’s a good reason why. Not everyone is the same! Many people react differently to the same stimuli, so it shouldn’t seem strange that there will be lots of different answers.

I’d say a lot has to do with personal likes and dislikes. FI, I hated any kind of distance running, but loved sprints. So, unless someone came to me with solid proof that long distance running would be significantly more beneficial, why would I do it?

Nothing is NECESSARY. Meaning you aren’t going to die or likely be permanently physically injured if you do absolutely nothing after pitching. The reason to do anything is to make your mind and body’s recovery easier.


#4

[quote=“Drewski”]hey, after long toss or mound work, is long distance running or short agility/sprinting which is most beneficial…
also, once you get blood flow is ice even necessary?[/quote]

I’ve heard that before and after pitching,
a pitcher should run (either at least down a foul line (the whole field) or around the circumference of the field).
Before pitching, a pitcher needs to “warm up” his body,
which can include playing catch, running, etc.
After pitching, a pitcher needs to “cool down”.
This can also be down by jogging (or running) around the field.
Running (or jogging) can help a pitcher warm up and cool down his body.