Advice on upper body workouts


#1

With the HS season over, it’s time for me to get serious and hit the weights. I’m a sophomore and up to this point, I’m pretty much running on natural ability, but still having success (80-85mph). I’m scared that if I do too many arm workouts, I’ll lose flexibility and velocity.

What do you recommend is the right amount of working out for each specific area? (biceps, triceps, shoulders)

And which workouts are good and bad?

Lastly, would I be better off not worrying about those areas and just focusing on things like back, butt, and legs?

Thanks thanks thanks!

ps. I am doing Jobe work w/ light dumbbells and tubing on a daily basis.


#2

Its an important asset to work out all your muscles in your body, upper and lower. You can’t just workout your chest and biceps, you need to work out your back and triceps to balance them out.


#3

if you’re throwing 80-85 having never really weight trained before…you’re in for some serious velocity gains.

You need a balanced program that addresses your specific strengths and weaknesses.

You CAN try to come up with one on your own, and that is a viable option. It’s what I did from my sophomore year through the summer before my senior year.

During this time I gained moderate strength, going from maybe 160-174, but after I actually hired a GOOD strength coach, got a really thorough program and had somebody to talk to and troubleshoot with, I went from 174 to 194 from last june to thanksgiving. I would have gained a lot more too, if not for a 3 month long bicep tendon issue.

If you are able, i’d strongly suggest seeking out the programming advice of a top strength and conditioning coach, preferably one who works with a lot of baseball players.

In this regard, eric cressey would be your go to guy IMO, but there are others in the field too who would be good bets.

It’s just one less thing to think about knowing you have solid programming and can focus all your efforts on busting your butt rather than worrying if your program addresses GIRD or any other asymmetries you might have, periodization, etc. It’s DOABLE, but if you want to do a thorough job you’re going to have to dedicate a lot more time to it than you might think.

My solution was: get a job, use it to pay for my training under a coach who I knew was qualified, bust my butt, see my velocity increase.


#4

Lanky,
Did you work with Cressey at his facility? I see on his website he has an online consultant sort of thing…
It seems like you have a lot of respect for him and just wanted to see if you had any other information on him.


#5

two general rules of thumb:

  1. do as much work on the front of your body as the back. if you have a strength imbalance, work the weaker a little harder to get the strength to balance. for instance, you should do as much weight on leg extensions as you do on leg curls but this is rarely the case.

  2. more is not necessarily better. you can overtrain the muscles. three exercises per body part is plenty. any more and it’s too much. that’s what our guy says and he has 2 guys in the big leafues (one on the cover of muscle and fitness) 3 in double a, and last year’s no. 1 pick of the marlins.

you’ll hear different opoinions on here, pick what works for you and DO IT.


#6

[quote=“jpm”]Lanky,
Did you work with Cressey at his facility? I see on his website he has an online consultant sort of thing…
It seems like you have a lot of respect for him and just wanted to see if you had any other information on him.[/quote]

I’ve consulted with Cressey, yes, and still email back and forth with him on a fairly regular basis. I would train with him directly but his facility is 6 hours away from me.

I don’t want to go on about him too much though because people might get the wrong idea and think I’m just trying to promote him. I’m not, I’m just offering a resource that I have found to be very valuable for myself. Go to his website and read all of his articles and decide for yourself what to make of him. I’ve never met someone who was not thoroughly impressed by the guy.