Advice for a 10 yr old


#1

My son is a left handed 10 year old. He is currently hitting speeds of 50-53. Is that good for his age? Is it okay for him to use a change up at this age.

Thanks


#2

I think that is very good speed for a 10 yr old, his goal should be to add 5 mph each year. I don’t see a problem starting to add a change up especially if he can locate his fastball but I would use it very light 10% maybe.


#3

[quote=“wbbank”]My son is a left handed 10 year old. He is currently hitting speeds of 50-53. Is that good for his age? Is it okay for him to use a change up at this age.

Thanks[/quote]

My observations for 10U pitching, now that we’re finishing our son’s 10U year.

Most important for this age is a consistent delivery and good mechanics. Next would be developing a good fastball, and being able to locate the FB in or near the strike zone but not straight down the middle. IMO, movement on a FB -such as a 2-seamer- is preferred over a change up, since it will keep the ball off of the sweet part of the bat, and keeps the 10-year old focused on throwing his FB for strikes. Once the FB is solid, then it’s time to work on a change up. A change up is needed only to keep the good hitters honest.

My son threw three change ups out of 900 pitches in the LL Majors & Tournament Ball at 10U, and was very effective with his 2-seamer, averaging more than 2 strike-outs per inning. The best hitters put the bat on the ball, and then it was up to the defense to make the play. That’s why there’s nine on the field. Next year (@ 11U) I anticipate 10 - 15% will be change ups.

Velocity is secondary to a consistent delivery and solid mechanics.


#4

wbbank, how is your son doing in the off season, is his veolcity coming up or are you working on accuracy?


#5

I’m glad to see we have a youth pitching forum again. I wish Steve would move all the other youth pitching threads in here.

As for the 2-seamer, a pitching coach once told me that youth pitchers - 12 and under - throwing from 46 feet can’t make a 2-seamer move. He said it requires more velocity than they’re capable of, and over a greater distance.

Is there any truth to that?

My lefty 9-year old’s 4-seamer moves at times from 46’, so I don’t see why a 2-seamer couldn’t.


#6

You know it definately can have something to do with someone saying that their fastball (rises) well that just isn’t true but it might not drop like other pitches. At 46 feet I can see that the 2 seam can have different movement than the 4 seam and so it does have more “movement”. The physics don’t alway work when our brain is involved.


#7

[quote=“littlelefty”]

As for the 2-seamer, a pitching coach once told me that youth pitchers - 12 and under - throwing from 46 feet can’t make a 2-seamer move. He said it requires more velocity than they’re capable of, and over a greater distance.

Is there any truth to that?

My lefty 9-year old’s 4-seamer moves at times from 46’, so I don’t see why a 2-seamer couldn’t.[/quote]

Definitely movement on the 2-seamer at this age, depending, obviously, on the child.


#8

My son is pitching inside at about 30 feet due to weather and space limitations. We are using a nerf baseball for safety. We are not even measuring velocity but working on location, control and mechanics. He is pitching about 4 days a week for about 8 simulated innings.

Do you think this is a good plan?


#9

How does your 10-year-old son’s 2-seamer move compared to his 4-seamer? Drops? Slides? Both? Also, how much slower is it if any? Thanks.


#10

Interesting.

My just-turned-9-year-old throws hard and I have been working with him a little on a three finger change up (recommended by a youth pitching coach). He throws it well when he doesn’t change his delivery but sometimes he seems to focus on the word “change” and changes his delivery compared to his normal fastball delivery. He’s thrown it in games a few times: a couple times it worked well, a handful of times he threw it high.

Maybe we should try the 2-seam “fastball” (I think he’ll like that word better!) and ditch the change up until he’s 10 or 11? What to do think?


#11

Oops, it posted twice.


#12

That seems like a lot of pitching. See this:

http://www.abe.msstate.edu/Tools/baseball/articles/Prevention%20of%20Arm%20Injury%20in%20Youth%20Baseball%20Pitchers.pdf


#13

That seems like a lot of pitching. See this:

http://www.abe.msstate.edu/Tools/baseball/articles/Prevention%20of%20Arm%20Injury%20in%20Youth%20Baseball%20Pitchers.pdf[/quote]

Thanks for the info! We better scale back some.


#14

Excellent…I hope you really mean that, so many kids get blown out way before they get the chance to do some real good on the diamond. :smiley:


#15

Yes. I read a rule of thumb that “5 mph x age” is top velocity. I think it works. Think of a 17 year old high school pitcher throwing 85 mph (5 x 17). That’s smoke. Think of the 12+ year olds in the LLWS throwing 60+ (5 x 12). Smoke again.


#16

That seems like a lot of pitching. See this:

http://www.abe.msstate.edu/Tools/baseball/articles/Prevention%20of%20Arm%20Injury%20in%20Youth%20Baseball%20Pitchers.pdf[/quote]
Great article. Thanks. Am emailing it to everyone in my league.


#17

That is awesome, how about trying to get your league to develop some guidelines in the rules, most baseball people watched LLWS over the last few years and have heard the comments there so it would be a great time to get some leagues besides LL to move that way.


#18

A change-up is a great pitch to learn at his age. If he shows that he can command the strike zone with his fastball, the next logical progression is to teach and develop the change-up. Even though 10-year old hitters are a little raw, every level from here up will have kids that are good fastball hitters. However, at such a young age, many of these hitters are not used to seeing pitches come in at different speeds. So, to be able to locate a fastball for a strike and then comeback with a change-up ‘around’ the strike zone is huge.

A few years ago, I helped a 9U travel team by working with their pitchers, and when it came time to teach the change up, I actually had them work on having it hit the back of home plate. It was amazing how many young hitters will swing and miss at an off-speed pitch in the dirt. In effect, we had our pitchers get ahead in the count with their fastballs, and with a 0-2 or 1-2 count, threw a change-up in the dirt to entice the hitter to chase it. If he did, we had a strike out. If not, then it became a purpose pitch by changing the eye level of the hitter and we would come back with another fastball around the letters.


#19

Not sure if this is addressed to me, but our local Little League (“LL”) already has pitch limits and, interestingly, they’re actually more strict than those required by Little League of America (“LLoA”).

The biggest difference being that, where LLoA imposes daily pitch limits, such as 75 pitches per day for players league ages 9 and 10, our local LL takes those LLoA daily limits and makes them weekly limits too. As such, a 9 or 10 year old faces not only a daily limit of 75 pitches, but he also can’t throw more than 75 total pitches in a calendar week, even if he has sufficient days’ rest.

For example, a 9 year old who throws 40 pitches in a game on Tuesday could, under the LLoA pitch count guidelines, get his days of rest and throw 75 pitches in a game on Friday, for a total of 115 pitches that week (never exceeding 75 on a single day). In our local LL, however, that same 9 year old could throw only 35 pitches on Friday, for a total of 75 pitches that week.


#20

[quote=“south paw”]Not sure if this is addressed to me, but our local Little League (“LL”) already has pitch limits and, interestingly, they’re actually more strict than those required by Little League of America (“LLoA”).

The biggest difference being that, where LLoA imposes daily pitch limits, such as 75 pitches per day for players league ages 9 and 10, our local LL takes those LLoA daily limits and makes them weekly limits too. As such, a 9 or 10 year old faces not only a daily limit of 75 pitches, but he also can’t throw more than 75 total pitches in a calendar week, even if he has sufficient days’ rest.

For example, a 9 year old who throws 40 pitches in a game on Tuesday could, under the LLoA pitch count guidelines, get his days of rest and throw 75 pitches in a game on Friday, for a total of 115 pitches that week (never exceeding 75 on a single day). In our local LL, however, that same 9 year old could throw only 35 pitches on Friday, for a total of 75 pitches that week.[/quote]

And that’s one of the great things about the LL Inc rule. Leagues such as yours can make a more strict rule, but not less. Sometimes folks forget that many LL Inc rules are like that.

A few months back, I tried to get some data from LLI about pitch counts, in an attempt to see what was actually taking place. Williamsport said they didn’t get any such data, and neither do Regions. I contacted our District, and finally our local league, and none required any kind of reporting.

It turns out that there are some leagues that do have some kind of reporting system, and they range from calling in the pitchers and their counts, with nothing further, to one league I’m aware of that requires every pitcher in every game reported to the league office, and from that there is a daily list of all eligible league pitchers posted on line, emailed to every coach, and posted at every field. On top of that, umpires are required to check every pitcher against that list.

I even found one league that not only requires LLI pitchers to be reported, but they also have a few travel teams the local league supports, and those pitchers are required to be reported as well. That’s the closest I saw of what I’d love to see at the national level, where crossovers were reported too.

Could you tell us how your league controls the rule?