Advantages of windup position vs set postion?

I’m trying to become a good starting pitcher for a student baseball club in the Netherlands that just started a year ago. I am now focusing on good mechanics and a good fastball, mostly through selfstudy (reading book/websites) and throwing/expermimenting a lot. My question is this:

What are the advantages of throwing from a windup (stretch) postion vs from a set position? I always throw from a set postion because I feel I should “keep it simple”. I feel like adding the extra actions involved in throwing from the strech sometimes changes my balance or momentum and it lessens my ability to throw consistently. Although I think I could learn to throw just as good (or bad) from stretch I feel like I could learn a million other things that are more important such as a change-up or breaking ball, throwing more strikes etc. etc. Do you agree or am I missing something here?

From the Wind up you can get a better leg push and create more speed.

the stretch isn’t the windup. The windup is just that, and the stretch is the same as the “set” position. The advantages to pitching from just the stretch are you can keep it simple, but if you are inexperianced, or don’t have the best mechanics around, then you won’t get the leg drive you get from the windup.

yea thats why pitcher like armando benitez k-rod jon papelbon throw close to 100. the wind up helps you establish a rythem. it can also help you be deceptive. if you reach your appex position you achieve your maximum velocity.

I prefer that my 11Us always throw from the Set (aka stretch) position for exactly this reason.

Less to do = Less to screw up

I also don’t buy the supposed advantages of the wind-up. For example, it’s a myth that pitchers push off the mound with their pitching arm side foot.

Chris, could you please explain how it’s a myth that pitchers don’t push off? That makes no sense, if I didnt push off, my stride would be about 3ft long??

In general, pushing off the rubber refers to something that (supposedly) happens after the glove-side foot has planted.

You do kind of push off the rubber to stride, but there’s no significant difference in how this is done between a pitcher who goes from the Wind-Up position and one who goes from the Set position since both come to the same knee lift point.

From the apex (or high point) of the knee lift, both the Wind-Up and Set deliveries are the same.

Okay guys, thanks a lot for the response!

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]…it’s a myth that pitchers push off the mound with their pitching arm side foot.[/quote]This is an argument that’s been waged for ages with no conclusive result. It all comes down to semantics. Define “push”. Some consider it late, some early, some not at all. Some say it’s a “pull”. I don’t buy that one either.

The problem with this term “push” is that some kid out there takes it and opens up the hips and shoulder to face the target while the weight is still back near the rubber and then pushes that way, thinking this is the source of power. There’s also the danger of getting the upper body out too early (the most common definition of “rushing” I’ve seen).

I try to avoid the term as much as possible. Instead, I like to describe it as a “drive” sideways. On another board, a very knowledgeable poster used the term “rotational push” into landing. I like that one. Dick Mills uses the term “lunge”. That’s not bad either.

It’s all about how to get a player to do what he needs to do. “Push” just isn’t a very good term to use. It has too many issues. “Lunging” or “driving” sideways with a “rotational push” into landing is a far more productive mental cue than “push”.

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]In general, pushing off the rubber refers to something that (supposedly) happens after the glove-side foot has planted.[/quote]Who says so? Check out the pros. The back foot is nearly completely turned over onto it’s laces by footplant. How can you push in this situation? I can’t buy the push after landing thought. The actions of the pros just don’t support this contention.

One thing seems to have been overlooked here, and that is the situation that comes up when there’s a runner, or there are a couple of runners, on base. When a pitcher uses the full windup—especially when he uses a high leg kick or is slow to the plate, or both—the runner can get a good jump and steal a base; when the pitcher is working from the stretch or set position the runner is at a disadvantage. He can’t get a good jump, especially when the pitcher is using a slide-step in addition to the stretch. When the bases are loaded the pitcher can use either the full windup or go to the stretch; in my playing days I used to pitch from the full windup when the bases were full, otherwise I would go to the stretch with a runner or runners on. I used the slide-step all the time, regardless of the delivery; I found that it gave me extra speed. 8)

I prefer that my 11Us always throw from the Set (aka stretch) position for exactly this reason.

Less to do = Less to screw up

I also don’t buy the supposed advantages of the wind-up. For example, it’s a myth that pitchers push off the mound with their pitching arm side foot.[/quote]

Could be a first for me, but I agree with Chris here.

In a study that looked at this issue the authors stated:"This group went on to analyze the kinematics of throwing from these two positions (windup and set) finding the set position usually involved a reduction in the amount of thigh rotation, and a more vetrically oriented lower leg position. It was also noted that the direction of the stride showed less deviation when throwing a curveball from the set position. These workers suggested that pitchers may benefit by throwing from the set position
more often than is usually the case when dictated by game situations."
So there seems to be some advantage to throwing from the set position.