A straight arm or bent arm?

i see some pitchers completely extend their elbow like this as the move toward the plate.

tim lincecum does it and alot of people says he has awesome mechanics.

then some like maddux and clemens that never extend out (they make an upside down L)

is this a a timing issue? i think the first one is the begining stages of the “front side tilt” but not sure.

i never have arm problems in my shoulder of elbow but i do have arm problems.

the tendons that connect your bicep and forearm. in the middle of the joint opposite side of the elbow.

so i was wondering, which style of arm motion should be incorperated?

I doesn’t seem to matter.

Clemens and Maddux DO NOT make the Inverted L.

That’s why they have been healthy.

do you mean the glove arm or the pitching arm??

if its the pitching arm then it should extend… most durable pitchers elbows do extend completely at some point in their delivery before reaching the high cocked position… and an upside down L (inverted L) WILL KILL pitchers arms… it causes terrible timimg problems and if it doesnt it will put ALOT of stress on the shoulder,

just look at BJ Ryan, Barry Zito is going in the same direction as well

[quote=“newstarprospect08”]if its the pitching arm then it should extend… most durable pitchers elbows do extend completely at some point in their delivery before reaching the high cocked position…[/quote]Not really an absolute. Watch Nolan Ryan’s videos, or Roger Clemens. The only place they even come close to straightening out before getting to high cocked is just after the hand breaks from the glove and it then points downward, somewhat.

I see no correlation between the bend in the elbow during the windup to high cocked and the stresses that are put on the elbow or shoulder during acceleration, which happens later.

[quote=“dm59”][quote=“newstarprospect08”]if its the pitching arm then it should extend… most durable pitchers elbows do extend completely at some point in their delivery before reaching the high cocked position…[/quote]Not really an absolute. Watch Nolan Ryan’s videos, or Roger Clemens. The only place they even come close to straightening out before getting to high cocked is just after the hand breaks from the glove and it then points downward, somewhat.

I see no correlation between the bend in the elbow during the windup to high cocked and the stresses that are put on the elbow or shoulder during acceleration, which happens later.[/quote]

yea i never said they have to do it i just meant that there are alot of durable pitchers that do it at some point and its much better than to make the inverted L… and when people make the inverted L the have to very rapidly externally rotate to be on time… some people (bj ryan) and up having terrible timing problems and others have a very high risk of hurting their shoulders

is it easier to be at the high cocked position at landing with the bent arm or the straight arm? I have trouble getting my arm vertical at landing point.

chris, i was trying to say that clemens and maddux do not fully extend the elbow, it came out worng i guess.

and question…is the high-cocked position a bad thing?

chris, i was trying to say that clemens and maddux do not fully extend the elbow, it came out worng i guess.

and question…is the high-coked position a bad thing?

[quote=“drew_14”]chris, i was trying to say that clemens and maddux do not fully extend the elbow, it came out worng i guess.

and question…is the high-coked position a bad thing?[/quote]

i know im not chris but…

clemens does fully extend his elbow before reaching the high cocked position…no its not bad its where you want to be at landing…

i thought you scalp when you land?

is that to early or to late? either way, that might be one of my problems.

watch my video, iunno whats worng with my mechanics but i should be throwing alot harder for my size i think.

Hello, the glove arm can extend out toward the batter for timing, the throwing hand should break from the glove, go down and back(toward second base) or ball should face third base (right handers) or ( first base) for left handers. Throwing hand over the top ( fingers on top of the ball ), extend toward the catcher ( so the body get horizontal to the ground ), snap off the pitch and complete the pitch by slapping the opposite knee.