A couple questions about a certain pitch.....(screwball)


#1

I DO NOT plan on throwing a screwball anytime soon. I’m 15, and i want to start to throw one when i’m about 18. I won’t attempt to throw one hard untill then, but i just want to research it as good as i can untill then because it seems to be a pretty insanely distustingly nasty pitch once mastered…
so i just have a few questions…
1.Does anyone know how to throw one safely?
2.What do i have to do w/my arm/wrist action?
3.Do i have to do anything different w/my mechanics?
4.Are there any videos i can find where it teaches how to throw one and/or shows an actual screwball in action?
5.Are there any big leaguers that throw one?


#2

[quote=“Too_Mutch13”]I DO NOT plan on throwing a screwball anytime soon. I’m 15, and i want to start to throw one when i’m about 18. I won’t attempt to throw one hard untill then, but i just want to research it as good as i can untill then because it seems to be a pretty insanely distustingly nasty pitch once mastered…
so i just have a few questions…
1.Does anyone know how to throw one safely?
2.What do i have to do w/my arm/wrist action?
3.Do i have to do anything different w/my mechanics?
4.Are there any videos i can find where it teaches how to throw one and/or shows an actual screwball in action?
5.Are there any big leaguers that throw one?[/quote]

  1. I know how to throw it and threw it for some years before i stopped pitching in a team last year. i never had any arm problems my whole life, I won’t start telling you this is a safe pitch because it’s a breaking ball and a breaking ball puts stress on an arm. But i can tell you there’s one way to throw it that doesn’t involve snapping your wrist like you will see in most screwball description.

  2. If you know how to throw a proper curveball, (pulling down with fingers on top of the ball instead of snapping the wrist) then you know how to throw a screwball. For a curveball, when your hand comes by your head, your palm should be facing your ear. For a screwball, the top of your hand should be facing your ear (note that most people have a hard time doing it completly, it’s called pronation). As you come to the release point, for a curveball you pull down, giving the ball topspin. On a screwball, you do the exact same thing, except your hand is reversed.

  3. I don’t think you have to do anything different, though i read an interview a while ago about Jim Mecir saying the fact he would land open with his front foot would help him with the screwball.

  4. There’s some instructional things on the web, but i found them being awefully wrong and wouldnt recomand you to go look for them. Take in consideration here, i’m not an expert and i just tell you the way i learned it, a old minor league player that played AAA ball for the Montreal Expos in the 70s taught me how to throw it. As for videos of it, there was a video a couple months ago, a japanese pitcher throwing some with good shots of his arm motion, but they took it off. There was also a good Fernando Valenzuela video and they took it off too. If you can find the Blue Monday game (Expos vs Dodgers 1981) or any other game Fernando Valenzuela pitched somewhere like www.mlb.com in the baseball’s best section, it will cost you some fees though.

5.I don’t believe there is anyone right now, as for recent ones, John Franco used to throw one for the Mets, he retired. Jim Mecir used to throw one for the Marlins, he also retired.

I think this pitch is either something you should throw if it comes easy for you, or if opposed batters are giving you a hard time, OR even, if you want to be different and noticed. Even though there’s a lot of urban legends about this pitch and you might be noticed for the wrong reasons.

Basically this pitch is dead, and there is a lot of other pitches that will move to the arm side, though never as much as the screwball especially if you throw a loopy one like i did. It came up easy for me and i always wanted to have fun on the mound, winning or loosing came after that. I also always thought we had to entertain people that came to the ballpark and by watching them standing behind homeplate, protected by the fence, looking at me and waiting for the next screwball, i felt like i did my job.


#3

A sidearm changeup is very close to a screwball. Look at the movement on Pedro’s changeup, down and away to a lefty.


#4

I used to throw it, but I lost effectiveness when I threw it over the top, (i used to throw sidearm). I’ve heard that a pitcher who used to throw it )can’t remember name) that when he stood normally, his palm faced outwards, from so much pronation of his arm.


#5

I used to throw it, but I lost effectiveness when I threw it over the top, (i used to throw sidearm). I’ve heard that a pitcher who used to throw it )can’t remember name) that when he stood normally, his palm faced outwards, from so much pronation of his arm.


#6

youre talking about carl hubbell. Yeah, alot of pitchers tried it, just like a lot of kids tried smocking, because it was forbidden. Very few people keep it or are allowed to keep it. unless you really have it easy or want to develop it, it’s waist of time. but can be fun to play catch with and try to make it move.


#7

mike marshall used on his entire career and never had arm problems, you can go to his site and it will show how to throw the screwball the safe way and it will show his pitchers using it, although idk if you wanna go there.


#8

Carl Hubbell wasn’t the only pitcher who ended up with the palm of his left hand facing out when he stood with his arms at his sides, no thanks to the screwball. The same thing happened with Ed Lopat, who had a devastating screwball—although with him it was somewhat less extreme because he did not use that pitch exclusively. I remember one day when we were talking about that pitch and he asked me if I threw it. I said that I didn’t; although I knew how to throw it I never did because I was all too aware of how it can screw up your arm (no pun intended) if you use it too much and too often. Lopat said to me, “Good for you. You don’t need it.” Indeed I didn’t, because I had a whole closetful of breaking stuff.
Incidentally, there was a Cincinnati Reds pitcher, Joey Jay, who came up with a changeup screwball—he called it a slopslider—which he turned over a little; he used to bedevil opposing hitters with it. They all turned into Kleenex Kids, popping up one at a time. :slight_smile:


#9

i dont know do much about it. i know its the opposite grip of the curve. palm should be facing first and you pronate your arm. no snap