9u abuse?


#1

I just got back from my son’s first tournament. There were no pitching restrictions in this two day, 9u tournament. I witnessed a pitcher from another team throw 104 pitches on Saturday and come back and throw 128 pitches on Sunday. This kid was crying on the mound, holding his hand and arm, telling his coach (I assume his Dad) that he couldn’t do it. He asked at least four times if he could come out. He was finally pulled when he couldn’t come close to throwing a strike for a few batters in a row.

Did I just see something crazy that I hopefully won’t ever see again. Or, is this kind of thing more common than I think?


#2

[quote=“jchap”]I just got back from my son’s first tournament. There were no pitching restrictions in this two day, 9u tournament. I witnessed a pitcher from another team throw 104 pitches on Saturday and come back and throw 128 pitches on Sunday. This kid was crying on the mound, holding his hand and arm, telling his coach (I assume his Dad) that he couldn’t do it. He asked at least four times if he could come out. He was finally pulled when he couldn’t come close to throwing a strike for a few batters in a row.

Did I just see something crazy that I hopefully won’t ever see again. Or, is this kind of thing more common than I think?[/quote]

Yeah, crazy would be a good description. I’m curious to know who sanctioned the tournament. My son’s played travel for several years; each and EVERY tournament he’s ever played had pitching limitations. True most don’t have pitch limits but 3 innings normally burns a kid for the next day. Can’t believe this would be any type of sanctioned tournament.


#3

That’s absolutely insane! No way that should be allowed. :shock:


#4

Looks like he’s on the path to becoming a good Lacrosse player. :lol:


#5

We have entered several 8- and 9U tournaments here in the Northeast and there have been no pitching restrictions. Just a reminder to not overuse the kids.

I’ve yet to see a kid crying on the mound due to injury. Much less one who is then kept in the game.

I have seen kids throw 90+ pitches in three innings of work though, at both levels


#6

That is madness. Unfortunately it is driven by the idea of prioritizing wins above development.
Those kids of teams usually peak at 11 and the kids watch the varsity games and tell stories of how many batters they struck out when they were 10. Sad.


#7

I’d still like to know which organization sanctions tournaments with no pitching limitations. Played in numerous types as well as local “fundraising” tournaments & have yet to see one that didn’t have inning limitations (including mandatory rest after a specified number of innings).


#8

This was a tournament meant for part-time travel teams that drew from a two state area (near border). They put on several of these throughout the season. The rules stated “There are no pitching restrictions. Please use common sense.”

After this kid pitched, they struggled to find a pitcher who could throw strikes. They rode him to the championship game, but then had no one else who could help them much. They started the championship game with 6 consecutive BB/HBP. Needless to say, they didn’t win and our team won by never throwing a kid more than 48 pitches.


#9

Insane to use any kid yet alone a 9 yr old like he was used. Local non-sanctioned tournaments we’ve been involved in over the years have a summary of rules attached to schedule including pitching. I’m pretty sure all they’ve done is copied and pasted USSSA from website. Would be nice if someone sent the organizers of yours a suggestion to do the same. Apparently some people lack “common sense”.


#10

Agreed, that is a good idea.


#11

Some tournaments and leagues have restrictions, some don’t. The restrictions tend to favor deeper teams who develop a lot of pitching. Games without restrictions lend themselves to coaches over throwing a player if he is hot.

The league my son plays in has a 3 inning per game limit, with the intention of forcing teams to develop more players and keep greedy coaches from throwing one player 100 pitches.

Having done both, I greatly prefer games with restrictions. Even as a coach, it’s a different dimension to put a roster together and managing the roster over a long weekend when there are a lot of innings to plan pitching with different kids.


#12

We seem to see this every tournament. It’s crazy how coaches over use their pitchers.


#13

This should not happen but in 50 years of playing and coaching I have seen worse. I am always left wondering should I report this and to whom? When I have reported things it does not seem to do anything positive. I have gotten answers from Oh Joe is just like that to I have a talk with him but never seen any real changes. I just treat my children and players gently and try to not worry about winning. I found the less we concentrate on who wins the more we win and have FUN. I feel your pain.


#14

I had the same issues with my sons team as he pitched three innings on Tuesday then a Wednesday break because of rain Thursday three innings and Friday two and was going in on sat that’s when my wife and older son step up told the no way he is not pitching coach said great there goes my tournament. He hardly pitched anymore this season . Sometimes a coach wants that plastic trophy more than caring for a child . That burns my butt . I took him off that team.


#15

[quote=“jchap, post:1, topic:16425”]
9u tournament. I witnessed a pitcher from another team throw 104 pitches on Saturday and come back and throw 128 pitches on Sunday. This kid was crying on the mound, holding his hand and arm, telling his coach (I assume his Dad) that he couldn’t do it. He asked at least four times if he could come out. He was finally pulled when he couldn’t come close to throwing a strike for a few batters in a row.[/quote]
That’s not abuse; that’s criminal. Someone should have been arrested for child endangerment.


#16

This is without a doubt neglect of a child. A child of that age should not even be throwing 100 pitches. At 9, I am assuming they play 6 inning games. 1. That’s a high pitch count regardless of age at 6 innings. 2. Many high school pitchers are limited to under 100 pitches in a game to prevent injury. 3. A 9 year old should never throw more than 60 in a game-tops. It could be very damaging to the growth of the child’s arm.

Hope this helps, parents I encourage you to track pitch count it prevents injury greatly and keeps from Dad’s who start travel teams from making huge mistakes.

Coach T.
Http://pitcheronly.com


#17

The coach/dad is a tool no doubt.
Pretty hard to classify it as neglect (its not neglectful) abuse or criminal. That is just sort of silliness.
The kid is stuck with a bad coach/dad. So it goes sometimes.
The comparisons can be made to many things that are much more dangerous than this. It is foolishness and worse really, really selfish to do this to a young kid who is just playing a game. But, lets not jump off a bridge with it.