91mph fb What can This person do in this delivery to increase velocity


#1

Need to increase gvelocity, do not need flexibility or strength exercises. Looking specifically with movements in this delivery. I am very experienced with pitching. Just mechanical work, please do not advise long toss or a strength program! Thank you!! And hope to hear some comments for this delivery. Pitch is 91mph, please click on YouTube link, I had trouble uploading the video on here…


Can someone show me how I can get better
#2

Hard to tell by pausing and starting to see the movements but this person looks like they have pretty elite level mechanics, hence the 91 mph. Only thing I’m not super high on is how low in his lunge he is at front foot strike, with the hip bone almost even with his knee, and more than likely as a product how much he appears to dive down with his finish. I think landing in a bit taller position will help him drive his femur back into that front hip a bit more and get a better lead leg block. Blocking has correlation with velocity so it could add some more for him. This should also give him a better finish, although I don’t think the finish is really a problem I think it just appears funky because he remains so low in that lunge. I’ve attached a few pictures which should hopefully put what I’m talking about into a bit more perspective.

Taller landing position (notice back leg orientation and hip to knee height):

Lead leg blocking (femur pulls back into lead leg hip socket and facilitates trunk rotation, notice his release point and how rotated his upper half is):


#3

Seaver-esque


#4

How do you get to that position/make that happen


#5

I checked out a couple other videos of him on youtube. None that I found were in slow motion, so again it’s tough to really get a good look at his movements but it looks like he’s getting a lot of back leg flexion and that’s driving him down into that lower position. If that’s the case that definitely is harder to get out of. Think jump squat, if you go down to parallel or below and try to jump you can’t jump as high as if you were to half squat and jump. So, I’d take a look at how much that back leg is flexing and see if possibly having less flexion in it puts him into a stronger landing position.

Edit: I found a slow motion one from 2014 which was a longgggg time ago, but in that one there’s definitely more of a drop and drive type start to his motion. If it is still like that I’d work on staying tall and moving down and out at the same pace, while still staying aggressive with the back hip.


#6

It’s easy to see why you’re throwing 91 mph already. This is great:

However, I’d say the whole start of your delivery is a little schizophrenic, but you do get your body into the right position at this point.

I’d recommend this: Keep your initial “up tempo,” but step straight backat the start of your delivery instead of all the way toward third base. That’s wasted movement, because it takes your whole body off line with the direction of the target, which is straight ahead. Sprinters and pole vaulters, for example, rock forward and backward just prior to leaving the starting blocks – never side to side. It’s the same principle – you don’t want to deviate from the straight line to the target.

Now is stepping straight back going to give you an automatic 2 mph? Probably not. But I think you’ll find better consistency and control with your pitches, which will allow you to better utilize that 91 mph fastball and keep hitters off balance better.


#7

I see, I agree stepping back will add velocity… There seems to be such a big drag in my delivery that I think it hurting my velo and possibly the natural cut I have on the ball. What do you think I can do to help that. Look at how long my foot stays in the ground


#8

By drag in your delivery do you mean in your arm? And natural cut even on four seams? That could mean somethings off with your release/pronation. There’s evidence correlating velocity and going from supination/external rotation into pronation/internal rotation, so if somethings off there and you’re not getting into that point of pronation and instead cutting the ball that could possibly play a factor in lower than desired velocity.


#9

Ok so, I have this huge drag that is going towards first base and is about 2 feet long. When I do this I am throwing 87-91,92. When I don’t drag I am throwing 93-95. And I know everyone in the pitching world think that all hard throwers drag but it’s incorrect, I have guys on my team that are throwing 96-100 with very small drag or no drag at all. I wanted to see if you guys have any idea why my drag is so long and why it goes out towards first… Thanks


#10

Here is video of me throwing 93-94. My back toe is barely off the ground and I get a slight hip around. Which has increased my velo. It also seems that my front leg snaps a bit more.

But I feel that the back leg needs to be lifted higher and around more. Aka Fernando Rodney, Jake peavy… Almost and hard thrower


#11

I am also aware of pitchers throwing hard that drag- chapman.

I don’t really need a teaching class in mechanics, I know the correct mechanics. I am just having a difficult time learning the adjustments I need to make aka drills or timing things up so that I can get the results in my delivery that I need/want


#12

Any thing else you guys see that I can work on???


#13

You have a leak in effective directional energy, hence the unstabilized hop at the end of your delivery. Your front side has wasted energy and causes the slight head whip. But if you are looking for a small efficiency change in delivery, the small slight things are huge. The rhythm and timing of your explosiveness is too early. Smooth back, aggressive late. You get aggressive just a little too early.


#14

So what do you suggest to change that? Drills or whatever? When I have the quicker pace I seem to throw harder


#15

Well from the small clips you have posted I can tell you this…just watch the same clips…watch the direction your back knee starts to go when you begin your delivery towards the plate. A waste of energy and small ‘collapse’ that pushes your knee and therefore your body towards first base side…it then has to correct its directional line to the plate because thats where you are going…causing the spin off at your finish.

Your leg lift should charge up your backside from the foot up. Keep pressure inside your foot…maybe focus on staying a little more grounded with your ankle more in line and not worrying about your drag with your toe so much. This will keep pressure inside your calf and your knee will stay more in line. You will be able to create more torque…this will make you want to jump out faster but this is when you tell your body what to do instead of it doing what it wants. That is what i was referring too when I said be more aggressive through your release and not too it.


#16

Makes sense about wasting energy towards first base


#17

Who is it that you play for?


#19

I was with the Astros in triple A last year


#20

Would you be able to inbox me, I have some more questions.
Thanks!