9-10yr old grip and other questions


#1

Hey guys brand spanking new here. Looks like a good site with lots of info. Here are a couple questions I have.
The boys I will be coaching will be 9-10 yrs old. Smaller hands and first year of kid pitch ball.

2 seam or 4 seam fastball is one easier to hold than the other?
Both are okay to throw as a young pitcher?
I noticed that many young pitcher don’t go from the wind-up they start in the stretch position.
Why? Should I be coaching both or keep it simple from the stretch?
With the boys throwing in the 37-40 mph range would I even want to worry about a change up?

Thanks in advance


#2

Stretch only.
You will be lucky if your pitchers can grip the ball with only two fingers…most at this age hold it with three
Four seem but throwing strikes should be the goal
A pitchfork grip is easier to master with the age bc of their hand size. Teach them to bury it deep in the hand and throw it with FB arm speed.


#3

Thanks for the advice. I will definitely try it out


#4

I would encourage all the parents to try and take 30-40 minutes daily to step outside and play catch and practice proper throwing mechanics.knuckles facing you stuff. Daily throwing help my son build arm strength quick. Not pitching either. I wouldn’t be surprise if you had some kids who couldn’t throw from short to first right now. No one could argue with that. Kids love it. To many wait for the one or two practices a week and expect miracles.


#5

Great suggestion, and to heck with strengthening arms. I’ve done it with my son since he began T-ball and it’s a great way to develop a relationship with your kid. I can’t count the throws we’ve made back and forth, and I can’t count the conversations we’ve had while doing so!!!


#6

Thanks Hare bone,
It’s now part of our daily routine. 20-30mins.
Yesterday it surprised me I ask if he was done. He said no let’s throw some more. You absolutely correct he tells me about his day and I tell him about mine think it’s therapeutic for both of us. Lol.


#7

Totally!!! It’s my favorite part of baseball ever. How many sad stories you hear about the guy who never got the chance to play catch with his son. Don’t be that guy. Don’t let one day slip aways. 2 gloves and a ball anywhere.


#8

Agree 100% with 2002dad about the grip… So many coaches for that young age are focusing on the correct two finger grip when some of those little hands just aren’t really able to hold the ball well enough that way and it can lead to frustration. I held the ball with all fingers at age 9. I was actually discussing this with my older son’s coach because my younger son was having issues with keeping a good grip so I encouraged him to use three fingers,and coach told me he threw with three fingers till he was 13… btw, he was a first round draft pick so I know it didn’t stunt his development :slight_smile:


#9

At that age…they need to hold the ball how it is comfortable for them. I would stress throwing the ball hard while you work on mechanics. It doesn’t matter if they have perfect mechanics or they are working on them…throw with intent. If you teach them at an early age to slow down and throw strikes…it is very hard to have them turn it back up once they get their mechanics figured out.


#10

I never thought much about the grip. I can agree with what’s comfortable. I just saw a lot shot put type half cock throw. Knuckles facing back away from head.

I remove the video because it wasn’t a good demonstration.


#11

I would never have this guy teach my players or kid anything. He leaves his throwing arm completely straight when he shows kids how to throw!! WRONG WRONG WRONG!

This is SO WRONG!!!

Just saw that Harebone is the one who posted this video. Maybe this is why your kid is catapulting the ball. He has watched this guy pretend to throw a ball. That is NOT how we throw a baseball properly

This is terrible to show kids. He keep his arm straight and stiff while he turns his body towards his target. PLEASE DONT TEACH THIS!


#12

Wow. Just me but I prefer kids learning to first throw like an outfielder or pitcher, this way they don’t get stuck in the “power” position and then end up shotputting the ball; because they can’t put it together as one smooth motion after they see the coach break it into 1 break 2 hand up point to 2nd. 3. Throw. repeat over and over… I see so m my kids stop and pause before finally letting the ball go… They can learn to throw like an infielder or catcher later. And if a kid can throw. Don’t make him do throwing drills


#13

Fortunately the kids don’t throw like he demonstrates. I do understand what he is driving at- getting the elbow up. Elbows dropping is probably the most common problem when teaching someone to throw.

Pointing the ball at 2nd is not a good teach, and pulling down with the front arm is another incorrect piece of information.


#14

I looked at it again and that was the video we used. Mainly it was the knuckles facing target not ball. I just saw some many kids hurling it reaching back with ball facing target. I think we also used the break and elbow at target. If dsteg doesn’t recommend using this video I agree. No my son barely watched it if any. That catapult I hate to say is his natural arm path. That’s why I’m scratching my head on changing it. We are going to try and move it over towards third some cautiously. It is contorting his torso and head to much. His timing is to fast agree also. We can get that worked out slowly. The arm path is my worry. But its not good and maybe if we get it adjusted now before he pitches first real season it’s best. It could be putting pressure on his back and the leg kick is swinging.


#15

Maybe someone can post a short clip on showing kids a good beginning throw.


#16

This is isn’t video of kids throwing but it is a good basic explanation of how to throw. first it is not about pitching but just throwing. One of the things I like is that I feel anyone worth their salt in teaching someone how to throw starts from the bottom up… Feet, legs, hips, first then moves to upper body. When I work with my kids on their pitching one of the beginning warm-ups is a shuffle, shuffle throw drill, getting them to focus (by feel) on their alignment, their footwork and forget about their arms for a bit.

I typically like most of what this guy says, because if you watch the whole thing he continues his explanations towards a continuous motion, where many just stop at the steps, which, in my opinion, often gets interpreted by the youngster as disconnected steps…


Looking for help 9u first year pitching
#17

I made a website for questions like this. I used the drills on it with all my teams and my kid and over time they’ve helped tremendously. www.baseballthrow101.com