4th Pitcher-Video


#1

Here’s our last pitcher, He is about 6’4 and i definitly think he should be throwng harder than he is. Tell me what you think…

From the side

From the Front

both in half speed


#2

looks pretty good to me, it does seem tho tht he doesnt stride as much as he could if he is 6’4. his arm action looks good though


#3

My opinion - eliminate the football leg kick. Use that energy to go straight up with the knee, down and out toward the plate… and have him step back a little behind the rubber instead of to the side. Just an opinion and no special expertise here.


#4

In Bill Thurston’s video posted elsewhere on this site, he talks about throwing over the lead shoulder instead of squaring the shoulders. Take a look. I think this young man may have that tendency.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=7866929301428150864&q=ndg


#5

He appears to plant with the front foot rather closed. This can prevent full rotation of the hips which, in turn, can prevent maximum hip and shoulder separation. That could reduce velocity.


#6

[quote=“CNYbball27”]Here’s our last pitcher, He is about 6’4 and i definitly think he should be throwng harder than he is. Tell me what you think…

From the side

From the Front

both in half speed[/quote]

Here’s what I see…

  1. Doesn’t get his hips moving toward the target through the leg lift.

  2. Total Mark Prior, Inverted W arm action (which I hate). This video, and this guy’s velocity problems, should disprove the notion that the Inverted W arm action is the only way to achieve high velocity. I also wonder if he has damaged his shoulder, which could be limiting his velocity.

  3. Doesn’t seem to achieve great hip/shoulder separation.


#7

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]This video, and this guy’s velocity problems, should disprove the notion that the Inverted W arm action is the only way to achieve high velocity.[/quote]Who says that???


#8

Lands closed
IW no good at all
your arm action is not good and needs to be changed to at least to something like roger clemens.


#9

arm: his arm action isn’t something unusual but it’s something that i wouldn’t recomend. first, pause the video when he is landing and you will see that his pitching arm is close to horizontal. that can cause problems with rushing and tear off an arm in no time. what cause that horizontal movement is the way he lifts his elbow and brings it behind his body. now you’re asking for opinions so i’ll give you mine.

the pitcher looks like this


billy wagner

and i believe he should be looking like this


mariano rivera

now, i’m not a yankees fan or whatever and i’m not saying wagner is bad and rivera is good but i believe rivera has a better arm action. the problem with your pitcher’s arm is that as it goes behind his body, he brings his elbow up. just try doing it without the motion, just try to bring your elbow up and behind, you can feel your shoulder stretching and your arm feeling weird. now think about doing it violently in a pitching motion and you’re up for some shoulder injuries. that kind of arm action sometimes come from people who didn’t really learn about throwing using your legs and they relate more on the power coming out of their arm.

leg: being 6-4, he can definetly use these legs as a good way to get velocity and smoothness in his delivery. his backleg should be pushing him forward to give him more momentum toward home plate, his leg lift could be higher, (work on legs flexibilities)

look at the pitcher’s back leg and look at schilling’s back leg action

now, that’s not what people call drop and drive, it’s just helping yourself with your strong legs to get more momentum and you pitcher’s not doing it which might cost him mphs. he might want to try and move his body a little bit sooner forward to the plate to get even more momentum.

look at your pitcher’s leg lift and look at roger clemens legt lift

they are similar but clemens’ leg lift is higher which helps him to get more momentum to the plate.


#10

Something has been nagging at me since I first looked at the video, and it finally came to me. It really looks like he’s “aiming” the pitch.

His arm speed appears to slow as he approaches release instead of exploding out of his hand, and his wrist appears to be locked and his hand on top of the ball instead of behind it. I would wonder if he had control problems at some point in his pitching history and adopted this as a way to try to gain control. How is his control, BTW?

Chris O’ mentioned a possible injury, and with his apparent hesitation to let fly, that might be worth investigation.


#11

[quote=“hoseman18”] I would wonder if he had control problems at some point in his pitching history and adopted this as a way to try to gain control. How is his control, BTW?
[/quote]

His control seems to be alright but he was experiencing some arm soreness, more than usual.


#12

I agree with others that the leg lift does seem rather unusual, though that may be a very drastic thing to have him change out of, especially for a 6’4" pitcher such as himself. Something we’ve been taught over the last few days and that has helped me alot is having the toe hanging loosely.

The toe hanging loosely is not such a drastic change and is not hard at all. Having him do that will systematically have him landing on either the ball of his foot or flat which is perfect for velocity’s sake along with the hip rotation and drive. If he does not, it will tend to have him land on the heel of his stride foot, causing loss in velocity. In the video though, it seems that he is landing on the ball of his foot but then I see all over a little jump as if he were jumping away and trying to land on one foot to balance himself. Ask him if it takes some concentration to land on the ball of his foot as he does.

If he’s thinking about his stride leg and how it lands all of the time, then it will be harder for him to concentrate on the pitch itself. Mechanics are meant to be worked on both on and off the field, I will say that. But at the same time a pitcher’s mechanics, to him, must be instinctive, precise, something that he can do over and over and over again without faulting.