45 minutes for a pitching workout


#1

I’m doing some practice planning for six 45-minute Sunday pitching workouts with my varsity pitchers. We’re starting this Sunday at 8:45-9:30 in an indoor tennis facility because as you know here in Massachusetts there’s about 5 feet of snow :slight_smile:

However, 45 min is NOT a lot of time, which is irritating. My current plan is to:

  1. Dynamic warmup (10 min)
  2. Throw flat ground up to 120 feet (10 min)
  3. Throw 32-pitch bullpen (10-15 min)
  4. Tubing/med-ball exercises (10-15 min)

Like I said, it’s not a lot of time, and it’s only once a week, but it’s the best we can do. Any suggestions how I can maximize this time? And more importantly, I’m looking for some thoughtful discussion on practice planning for pitchers that other coaches can share best practices and ideas.


#2

[quote=“Steven Ellis”]I’m doing some practice planning for six 45-minute Sunday pitching workouts with my varsity pitchers. We’re starting this Sunday at 8:45-9:30 in an indoor tennis facility because as you know here in Massachusetts there’s about 5 feet of snow :slight_smile:

However, 45 min is NOT a lot of time, which is irritating. My current plan is to:

  1. Dynamic warmup (10 min)
  2. Throw flat ground up to 120 feet (10 min)
  3. Throw 32-pitch bullpen (10-15 min)
  4. Tubing/med-ball exercises (10-15 min)

Like I said, it’s not a lot of time, and it’s only once a week, but it’s the best we can do. Any suggestions how I can maximize this time? And more importantly, I’m looking for some thoughtful discussion on practice planning for pitchers that other coaches can share best practices and ideas.[/quote]
May I ask why you are limited to 45 minutes?


#3

We only have the space, which is actually an indoor tennis center, for 45 mins. I know, it’s horrible!


#4

[quote=“Steven Ellis”]We only have the space, which is actually an indoor tennis center, for 45 mins. I know, it’s horrible![/quote]We went through a similar problem at Iowa Western at the start of spring semester. However, we were able to throw 7 days a week. We usually were in the gym for 1.5-2 hours a day too. Your planning sounds right, stretching, throwing, bands, all good. For days when your not throwing bullpens, doing long toss into a net is what we would do to stretch out our arms.


#5

re: “Any suggestions how I can maximize this time?”

----------Your 45 minutes in the facility are fully used by the plan you outlined. The only way to squeeze more out of these sessions is to spend 5 minutes afterward talking to your group about what they should be doing on their own time at home.

In another thread, you were discussing holding runners close…pitchers can (and should) practice their pick-off/hold’em close moves at home…tell them to make a ball out of some socks, and practice their pick-off moves at full speed somewhere in the house where they won’t break anything…

Pitchers should also have conditioning routines that they can follow on their own time at home…prone holds, regular pushups, triceps pushups, crunches, forward and backward lunges, etc, etc. These can all be done indoors without equipment. What’s more, you can occasionally monitor who is really working on their own time by getting the group together to go through some of these things…praise the guys who seem to be making progress on their own toward becoming better/stronger/more skilled/etc.

A variety of towel drills can also be done indoors without a partner.

Explain to your guys: If other factors are pretty much equal, the guys in your geographical area who use the bad weather days to diligently work on their own toward pitching-related conditioning and skills development are going to have a huge competitive advantage over those who do not.


#6

Steve, this reminds me of an old cartoon I saw in a newspaper once, about a bunch of guys in a rowboat, depicting Washington crossing the Delaware, where the captain was yelling at them "Men, row faster! We only have the boat for an hour!"
It’s not much fun when pitchers have to compress a workout into 45 minutes because a bunch of tennis players have to use the space. So you do what you can. I remember when one gloomy Sunday morning, with the threat of rain, Ed Lopat worked with me on holding runners close and pickoff moves, but we got in a good two hours—and the rain started just as I got home. Yep, the Yankee game was rained out.


#7

I think that’s a pretty good routine for 45 minutes…

Two thoughts:

  • Do you have the 32 pitches planned out for your pitchers? 10-15 min for 32 pitches is pretty quick.

  • For the tubing and med ball, do you have to cut into your time for the area? I would think you could do that off to the side and not disrupt whatever activity is coming up after you.

Stu


#8

I like your short program, I have the same question of do you have the 32 pitch program outlined?


#9

Its jist the sides that i outlined in tuffcuff… however to start its fastballs to both sides of the plate out od the full and stretch


#10

I like laflippin’s recommendations, not only for the content, but mainly for the overall concept. You have to have some kind of work outside that time slot to truly make it effective. The challenge you will have, and I’ve been there over the winters here in Nova Scotia, is that there’s no time to discuss anything, ask them to try things because of what you’ve seen, without eating into time for the totality of items you listed. So, take lots of video and analyze/critique them prior to the 45 minute session. Email comments back to them and tackle them in a more focussed way when you get there. It’s more work for you, believe me, but it pays off.