3 Reasons Pitchers Throw Across Their Body

I recently spoke with Derek Johnson, pitching coordinator for the Chicago Cubs and he was discussing why pitchers throw across their body. Interesting read!

http://baseballthinktank.com/3-reasons-why-pitchers-throw-across-their-body/

Interesting stuff indeed ThinkTank thanks for sharing.

The question you need to answer is, are you in agreement with it’s use?

You see this recovery mechanic with all that employ the conventional centripetal (arm centrifuging laterally away from the bodies rotational axis) pitching mechanic.

I have a huge issue with this arm recovery phase mechanic!!!

It causes Little League shoulder- proximal (near the head) Humeral growth plate brake’s, torn rotator cuff injuries (Terres Minor grade tears) and posterior Ligament lengthening (loose shoulder capsule)(dead arm) in youth pitchers and the later 2 in adults.

I immediately change the mechanic that causes this and always get immediate relief results.

Yes, although landing across pushes the “over early rotation” gateway at glove foot strike, it is not the main mechanic that causes this problem in that you can step across and still attain a straight and aligned shoulder start. Eliminating stepping across the field driveline does help.

I wish you would go back and highlight his exact quotes so that we do not get the impression that he wrote the whole article.

The question he needs to answer is whether he agrees with this mechanic or not and why?

This is known as an “imperative” mechanic that causes the body to start in the direction that throws this mass into it’s later path.

Ain’t it the truth, this is so easily understood in the bio-mechanics field and all should really listen up here, nice! All pitching injuries are biomechanically diagnosed through this method.

It actually happens long before this at leg lift where the shoulders (acromial line) and the hips (acetabular line) “over early rotate” past the field driveline causing centripetal imperative where when you now drop in your shoulders and hips start moving back the other way exacerbating Humeral/forearm flyout that causes many types of shoulder injuries and intuitive supinative forearm drive that causes many types of elbow injuries.

I don’t see how this effects early or late rotational flaws?

I don’t see how this effects early or late rotational flaws?

One of the main causes for recovering across your body is as the arm flies away from the body and the forearm is supinated, the elbow is headed down and proximal end of the Humerus is levered against the ball side pectoralis major, then the forearm and hand is slapped across glove side ribs. This is all exacerbated by the poor late rotation of the conventional mechanic that has you bent at the back (Lumbar injuries) with your chest forwards and your ball side leg up in the air in the poorest defensive position possible to react to line drive come backers or just defending your position.

[quote]
“Bonus: Well, there’s actually another one. The pitcher will swing his lead leg into lift and the back foot will spin away from the rubber. Take a look at the picture below.”[/quote]

This is one of the first that should have been mentioned and is paramount in gateway causation, nice pick here.
I teach my clients to step in at a 45 degree foot set with the big toe, second toe, third toe and forth toe hanging over the front edge of the pitchers plate like Sandy Koufax and Satchel Page.
This allows us to push off the rubber instead of dirt and we do not have to mess with others holes. Now we attain the ability to use the large muscles in our legs to drive and land stabilize with instead of the tiny “splits drive” muscle of the outsides of the legs to drive with and the small inner muscle of the groin to decelerate used with the conventional step in.

Nice work thinktank! and very important when trying to eliminate all these different types of injuries.

Yardbird

                         Yes, I am in agreement
                      I think it all depends.  Would you change a relief guy that makes his money on being funky and being a situational guy facing same sided hitters?  On this other side, pitchers that focus on sinking the ball will often find themselves on the closed side of the equation, cause and effect.  

I agree, everything affects everything. However, those could also be affected by poor function of the posterior chain due to a lack of mobility/stability. What comes first?

Again, I agree. The key is identifying the mechanic and often the mechanic can be changed by a simple intent change. Immediate is not a word I would use, personally.

This was not taken verbatim, based on our conversation I added my own twist but these are his orginal thoughts and wanted to make sure he was given due credit.

I agree.

Again, I agree it can, it’s just a matter of opinion when it happens and most often is dependent upon the individual and stage of development and the players ability to move and provide stability.

[quote]“The player will actually look down to the spot, unknowingly, at some point in his delivery. Therefore, his “eyes take him where he doesn’t want to go.”

I don’t see how this effects early or late rotational flaws?[/quote]

IMO, It’s experienced when the central nervous system receives conflicting information from the eyes.

[quote]“The pitcher will shift his weight to the ball of the back foot pre-maturely. (Ideally, you want the weight centered underneath the ankle bone.) As the weight shifts to the ball of the foot early, the center mass is no longer driving the direction of the lower body. Keep in mind, that the center mass (the area from the top of the thigh to the belly button is the control center for movement and direction.)”

I don’t see how this effects early or late rotational flaws? [/quote]

Why couldn’t it? I think it all depends at when it occurs. It’s amazing how the feet affect the center mass. I like watching how players travel foot to foot. Personally, I think the feet/timing of weight shift are primary influencers of the CM’s action.

[quote]I teach my clients to step in at a 45 degree foot set with the big toe, second toe, third toe and forth toe hanging over the front edge of the pitchers plate like Sandy Koufax and Satchel Page.
This allows us to push off the rubber instead of dirt and we do not have to mess with others holes. Now we attain the ability to use the large muscles in our legs to drive and land stabilize with instead of the tiny “splits drive” muscle of the outsides of the legs to drive with and the small inner muscle of the groin to decelerate used with the conventional step in.[/quote]

I agree, I like to pre-set the feet, especially in all the lower body drill work. I’ve also seen guys over-rotate with this but it’s always per individual. I like the idea of pre-loading the hips and I’m a big fan of the Old School guys. I like to refer to the pre-setting as “getting the hips in front of the hands.”

I have a problem with landing open, I land about half a foot to a foot open, what are the most common reasons for that?

There is actually a fourth reason why some pitchers throw across the body. A sidearmer who uses the crossfire a lot will do that—but it’s nothing to be concerned about. As long as the pitch gets in there for a strike… :roll: