3-Quater Arm Slot

Can some one explain to me how it is?

You basically have 4 arm slots (or 4 ways to pitch):

  1. Overhand
  2. 3/4
  3. Sidearm
  4. Submarine

1: Overhand:

Overhand is the most used, I think. The hand is at the top when the pitcher releases the ball.
Here is a overhand-type pitcher picture

2: Three Quarters:

The hand is at or about 45º at release.
Here is a pic of a three quarters pitcher

Actually, Wagner is a low 3/4. Almost a sidearmer.
You have a high 3/4, the true 3/4 and the low 3/4.

3: Sidearm:

The hand is parallel to the ground upon release.
Randy Johnson is a sidearmer

4: Submarine:

Throws the ball upward with his hands almost at the groundlevel upon release.
Chad Bradford throwing

Thank you. What is the best for an 11 year old? Playing in select ball.

I’m not a coach, I’m just a player. There is a myth about the arm slot being natural.
I had a 3/4 slot, but I was having problem with control. So my coach asked me to try to throw more overhand style. And my control was back. Now I throw overhand and I’m good with it.

I really don’t know what slot is better. But I do know that you should avoid the submarine style and might also want to avoid sidearm, because those 2 types put too much stress on the arm/shoulder.

Try and see what is better for you and go for it. Just remember to have good mechanics and work hard hehe

Thank you. :mrgreen:

I’m not a coach, I’m just a player. There is a myth about the arm slot being natural.
I had a 3/4 slot, but I was having problem with control. So my coach asked me to try to throw more overhand style. And my control was back. Now I throw overhand and I’m good with it.

I really don’t know what slot is better. But I do know that you should avoid the submarine style and might also want to avoid sidearm, because those 2 types put too much stress on the arm/shoulder.

Try and see what is better for you and go for it. Just remember to have good mechanics and work hard hehe[/quote]
Are you sure “natural arm slots” are just a myth? I believe there are physiological differences between people’s shoulders and that these differences make different arm slots more comfortable for different people. Using an arm slot that is outside of one’s comfort zone is probably a recipe for injury.

When I work with young pitchers, I don’t mess with their arm slots unless I think they are trying to use an unnatural arm slot. But that’s a rare occurrence. The trick how is to figure out what a pitcher’s natural arm slot really is. One suggestion I’ve heard is to put a bucket on home plate and have a pitcher try to throw a ball from center field and hit the bucket. Of course, don’t tell the pitcher the purpose of the drill. Simply observe the arm slot they use.

These genetic differences (e.g. space below the Acromial process) only come into play when you are talking about talking the elbow above the level of the shoulders. Since that’s always a bad idea, I don’t think that’s relevant.

As long as your arm slot is achieved by tilting your shoulders, then you are OK.

I like a 3/4 to high 3/4 arm slot because it gives the ball a pretty much vertical motion (which is best for throwing a straight fastball as well as a wicked curve).

This is achieved by tilting the shoulders.

[quote=“Roger”]Are you sure “natural arm slots” are just a myth? I believe there are physiological differences between people’s shoulders and that these differences make different arm slots more comfortable for different people. Using an arm slot that is outside of one’s comfort zone is probably a recipe for injury.

When I work with young pitchers, I don’t mess with their arm slots unless I think they are trying to use an unnatural arm slot. But that’s a rare occurrence. The trick how is to figure out what a pitcher’s natural arm slot really is. One suggestion I’ve heard is to put a bucket on home plate and have a pitcher try to throw a ball from center field and hit the bucket. Of course, don’t tell the pitcher the purpose of the drill. Simply observe the arm slot they use.[/quote]

I don’t know, like I said I’m not a coach and I never really did a research.

I said that because I was a 3/4. That was my “natural” arm slot. But I was having a tough time throwing strikes. Then my coach asked me to change to more like an overhand slot.
I changed it and I couldn’t believe I was there putting strikes. Now, when I’m pitching I release the ball overhand.

I was a Shortstop before pitching and when I’m not pitching but playing on another position, when I have to throw the ball I throw it more like a 3/4 slot.

I think I’m a natural 3/4 but when I’m pitching I prefer throwing overhand.

Chris, what is your medical background?

These genetic differences (e.g. space below the Acromial process) only come into play when you are talking about talking the elbow above the level of the shoulders. Since that’s always a bad idea, I don’t think that’s relevant.

As long as your arm slot is achieved by tilting your shoulders, then you are OK.[/quote]
Well, not everyone agrees with tilting the shoulders to achieve a particular arm slot so I feel it certainly is relevent.

How can they disagree with tilting the shoulders?

Tilting the shoulders is the only way to alter one’s arm slot.

Are you saying that everyone should throw sidearm?

I don’t have any formal medical training, but over the past year I have read hundreds of journal articles and have developed a good sense of the physiology of pitching. I have also validated this with knowledge I have gained from following the work of Dr. Mike Marshall.

In a prior life I spent 3 summers working for a law firm analyzing the medical histories of plaintiffs in a lawsuit looking for signs of Asbestosis.

Our client never paid out on a single claim.

How can they disagree with tilting the shoulders?

Tilting the shoulders is the only way to alter one’s arm slot.[/quote]

I guess I’m wondering why someone would want to alter their arm slot.

No. Are you saying that the shoulders need to be tilted to throw with any arm slot above sidearm?

In many cases (e.g. curveballs) it’s more effective to throw from a more vertical arm slot.

For example, a kid might make it through grade school throwing sidearm fastballs and then need to change their arm slot in order to throw a curve.

Yes.

So can you tell me which Pros use what? and there strengths? ( sorry I dont know too much about MLB). BTW I as “not authorized” to open those links for overhead and 3/4 slot.

It varies widely, with different pitchers being successful from different slots.

The general consensus is that it’s easier to throw a curveball from a higher arm slot. I also believe that throwing from a higher arm slot can make any pitch harder to hit.

11-13 year olds MUST stay with the overhand arm slot. also NO CURVEBALLS, strictly changes and fastballs, theyre way to young and undeveloped to hurt their elbows by throwing curves,sliders,etc

Roger wrote:
I guess I’m wondering why someone would want to alter their arm slot.

Roger-some pitchers change their arm slots in order to get pitches to act a certain way. Burt Blyelven the owner of the most viscious droping curve I ever saw would drop down to side arm on right handers just to give the batter a differnt look and gain the advantage of the side armers optical illusion. El Duque and Arroyo do it today. David Cone was very successful with it as well.

Not every pitcher is a power pitcher. Some guys are never going to throw in the mid ninties. They still need some ways of getting batters out, and sometimes they need a strike out. Thats why some guys change arm slots.

Ian

Thats not true at all… I’m 11 and I can throw a beginners curve. Its got the same effect as regular but it doesnt hurt your arm.