2 Weeks later - I'm still missing something please help

From what “I” see there are many things that “look” great. He stays closed, does not land towards 1st, has a good extension with the back leg, leads with the elbow etc…BUT as he is releasing (stop frame), you will see that he looks awkward. I think that is what is keeping his velocity down. Am I right on that?

What can be done here? Is the follow-through the BIG problem? Is there anything glaring? Is there anything that looks good?

It looks like his body collapses just before release/follow-through.

Follow-through is a non-teach. The ball is gone so it has no bearing on the pitch.

I would had this young man start with some bend in the knees and waist and then get his center of gravity (think “butt” or “hips”) moving faster.

I would also get him to not swing the glove out to the side but to keep the glove in front of his body.

He does look a bit stiff on the bottom half…there is drill work out there that can work on getting the bottom to work better with the top…it usually doesn’t really happen until later into hs due to strength issues but it is something to work on, the towel drill is a great sequencing drill…as long as you do it right and don’t think it’s something to be done more than just a few times to sync things up (Some out there think it should be done for great lengths of time…I don’t find that very meaningful…just enough to sync it up then get a ball in his hand).

Keep working on the front side. Roger is right looking at him after he lets it loose isn’t where you’ll find the answer.

[quote=“Roger”]Follow-through is a non-teach. The ball is gone so it has no bearing on the pitch.

[/quote]

Please excuse the thread jack, but i have a question, o great guru from the North…

While i agree with the idea that the follow through doesnt directly affect the pitch, because as you said the ball is gone, doesnt it indirectly the pitch? The way it was described to me was this: if a pitcher isnt following through “enough” that means the arm is decelerating when it should still be moving at full speed through the throw and release stage. I always used an airplane analogy to try to explain it to my son. The throw and release is the airlpane flying, and the follow through is the landing sequence. You cant land the airplane until the flying part is completely done.

I know that the analogy is probably not perfect, but it helped me explain it to a 10 yr old. He has had a wicked problem with control (mostly leaving everything WAY high)for the last 8 or 10 months and it has just been literally the last three weeks at AS practice when his coach has been making him almost over exaggerate the follow through that his control has reappeared.

Now in the interest of full disclosure, he has worked on other things with my kid, leading with hip front hip and keeping his head steady through the entire pitch, but the follow through thing seems to be the thing that most dramatically affects his performance.

So, now that ive typed all this im wondering if you just meant that as long as the kid is following through properly, you dont change it, or coach it to look any particular way. But anyway…guess i’ll post it anyway :slight_smile:

Usually a kid that moves explosively to the plate, drives hard off of the back leg, gets out to a long stride, and releases the ball out in front of his body, will naturally follow-through. With regards to your son, his lack of follow-through appears to be a symptom of much of the above. I would recommend he work exclusively from a mound with a rubber - this often changes his stride and release point, not to mention the ability to drive off the rubber. Another suggestion regarding his mechanics would be to not bend over at the waist - he’s breaking his hands too far from his body. Have him work to stay upright and continue to work his hands down and close to his body.

There are other issues but this is a good start!

S.C.-

First, I ain’t no guru and I ain’t from the north unless you’re in South America. :wink:

Stuctdoc pretty much explained it. And you are partly correct, too. If the follow through ain’t happening then, yes, you could be slowing the arm down before it should. But if that’s happening, then you’re probably not doing something else right either - like not generating enough momentum.

The thing with the pitching delivery is if you see what looks like a problem, you have to back up and look at what happened earlier to see if there is a cause. If you find one, then the original problem isn’t a problem - it’s a symptom of the earlier problem. BUT, if you find an earlier problem, don’t stop there. Continue backing up to find the earliest problem you can find. That’s what needs to be fixed.

[quote=“Roger”]S.C.-

First, I ain’t no guru and I ain’t from the north unless you’re in South America. :wink:

Stuctdoc pretty much explained it. And you are partly correct, too. IF the follow through ain’t happening then, yes, you could be slowing the arm down before it should. But if that’s happening, then you’re probably not doing else right either - like not generating enough momentum.

The thing with the pitching delivery is if you see what looks like a problem, you have to back up and look at what happened earlier to see if there is a cause. If you find one, then the original problem isn’t a problem - it’s a symptom of the earlier problem. BUT, if you find an earlier problem, don’t stop there. Continue backing up to find the earliest problem you can find. That’s what needs to be fixed.[/quote]

South America…nope Ive been to Columbia, but never Colombia. Thats funny…i dont know why i thought you lived up North…it says right there under your name Arizona. :slight_smile:

Anyway, i figured that was the case. But i had already typed out that post and didnt want to waste it :smiley:

My suggestion is to get the right hip rotating fully. It’s not at the moment. Just as he’s about to land, have him rotate the hips such that the right knee/upper leg rotates under a lot more than it does now. Watch how his back foot slides out and around and lands even with the front foot, instead of ahead of it. An indication of a couple of things. One being a potential lack of momentum. Another being a lack of hip rotation and a third being a re-direction of momentum to the right. Keep the momentum going toward the plate and rotate the hips fully. The back foot will naturally, not forced, take a path more up behind him and hopefully land ahead of the front foot, not even with it.

Thanks for looking and your help. We worked on getting the hip moving faster last night. I played the video over and over and saw he never really got the hip into the pitch(s) at all - he rotated and bent from the middle of his back.

He threw 25 or so pitches yesterday and as he was getting close to 20 or so, his arm started to fall - so he was not overhand or 3/4 it would have been a LOW 3/4. He wants to play travel baseball and hears nothing but how speed is what coaches are looking for.

He throws sidearm or lower slot (I have posted some vids in the recent weeks) and is comfortable that way, but again slower. He even seemed to have a better follow through and control.

My question - Is he just not “strong” enough to keep the arm up in overhand or 3/4 and needs to work on strength in that area to consistently get the elbow and arm around or is the eventual arm falling his body naturally going to where he should be throwing from?

He has said that he has to think about the pitch more overhand - getting into a high cocked position and leading with the elbow etc.

We are heading to a pitching / defense camp this week for some more analysis.

Thanks again for your help! This is a a great resource!

If he is more comfortable throwing low 3/4 or sidearm, then that’s probably what he should be doing. I don’t know that I’d go so far as to say it’s a strength issue as much as it is a comfort issue.

If he incorporates more front leg into his delivery, it will naturally give him a follow through. When he lands on his front leg his body absorbs it, and doesn’t use it to drive his hips. I would say that is what he is lacking, and the best way to do this is to get him to play very long toss, and think about how he is using his front leg when throwing. It simply does not work just telling him, he has to experience the difference.

We have been working on his release and location. This is a video from behind with his sidearm delivery. He is dragging his back leg through release in this video which we found slows down the pitch and causes it to drop quite a bit. When he tries to throw crossfire, (I will put that up tomorrow) the ball doesn’t drop much.