1st Scrimmage 13 yr old

1st Scrimmage Game of season - 13 yr old.

Any tips would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Phil

Namaste,

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[quote=“KCDawg”]Namaste,

This shows up as a Private video. Unless you are a member of vimeo and have been granted access, you can’t see the video. Can you change the status to Public?[/quote]

Fixed-

Sorry about that…

Namaste,

It looks to me as though you have a weak and inconsistent glove side.

The glove side is important in a balanced and accurate pitching delivery–it should essentially ‘mirror’ the action of the throwing arm into footstrike.

Between footstrike and release of the ball things happen very, very quickly…but…during that very short interval your glove-side should swivel into place out in front of your torso, stabilize approximately over your stride foot, and you should bring your torso forward to meet the glove.

Sometimes people still talk about ‘pulling the glove’ into the body; however, motion analysis of elite pitchers has largely debunked that idea.

Look at this video clip and just focus on the glove-side action throughout the delivery: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOAuyIv3tyc

[quote=“laflippin”]Namaste,

It looks to me as though you have a weak and inconsistent glove side.

The glove side is important in a balanced and accurate pitching delivery–it should essentially ‘mirror’ the action of the throwing arm into footstrike.

Between footstrike and release of the ball things happen very, very quickly…but…during that very short interval your glove-side should swivel into place out in front of your torso, stabilize approximately over your stride foot, and you should bring your torso forward to meet the glove.

Sometimes people still talk about ‘pulling the glove’ into the body; however, motion analysis of elite pitchers has largely debunked that idea.

Look at this video clip and just focus on the glove-side action throughout the delivery: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOAuyIv3tyc[/quote]

Thanks for the Tip, we’ll take a look at it.

This young man either doesn’t have much of an issue with control or the umpire didn’t know how to say anything but “Strike!” Follow LA’s advice and you should see the consistency become even better. Oh - and watch your language :lol:

Yeah, he doesn’t have much problem with throwing strikes.
What makes you think that was me with the foul language? LOL

Thanks

I need to get him gunned, I hear he’s throwing 70.

I’m amazed those batters stood in there and let that kid work at that pace. Did you guys have to be some where? LOL

Did the other team never even take a sign? When my son is in a groove, he can work pretty fast off the mound. Or, at least I thought he did up until I watched this video. Compared to this, my kid moves at a glacial pace.

I tell him to work as fast as he can and still stay in control. It’s not his job to wait for the batter to get all set once they are in the box. They just happen to be there when he’s throwing. I figure, he’s holding the ball - it’s his game and his pace…

…and it seems the players on the other teams just sort of get in the grove of stepping in and striking out.

Should I be concerned with him working a game that fast?

I can’t answer that, but there’s no way my son would let him work that fast/get into a groove like that. Can he still throw strikes with a batter stepping out of the box and breaking his rhythm?

I don’t know if I would be concerned, but I would watch it fairly close. Truthfully, he’s working so fast that I am willing to bet that at least part of his infield is not down and ready when he pitches. Also, is he taking any signs from the catcher? How can he get them so quickly, have time to set the ball in his hand, get mentally prepared to throw that pitch, and then deliver it in such an abbreviated time frame?

My next question is how does this affect him when he throws from the stretch? I have to admit that I didn’t watch the whole video, so this may have been addressed. But, if he is working this fast from the stretch, runners are just going to take off at first movement, knowing that he won’t come their way. Just as a pitchers job is to throw off the timing of hitters, his other job is to throw off the timing of runners stealing a base.

Taking what SomeBaseballDad said a little farther, there is no way that my team would let him work this fast. We take a sign every pitch. It’s not long and drawn out, but it gives everyone enough time to get set for the next pitch and focus on what they need to do. We’d also have every batter hold his hand to the ump for time as he got set in the box. If we run up against a pitcher that so obviously wants to work fast, we are going to slow everything up and make it miserable for him on the mound. You’ll see then if it matters or not. He may just ignore it and keep throwing strikes and getting batters out. Or, it may affect him negatively and you’ll have to work through it. But, that’s half the fun of competing, right?

Please don’t take any of what I said as a knock on your son. He looks like a good yound pitcher and is obvioulsy taking what the batters give hime. Kudos to him for that. Like I said earlier, in and of itself, I love a pitcher that gets to it and is ready to throw. It keeps his fielders on their toes and moves the game along. But, this is really fast, in my opinion. Not that it matters, but how would you describe the level of play in his league?

[quote=“KCDawg”]I don’t know if I would be concerned…

Please don’t take any of what I said as a knock on your son. He looks like a good yound pitcher and is obvioulsy taking what the batters give hime. Kudos to him for that. Like I said earlier, in and of itself, I love a pitcher that gets to it and is ready to throw. It keeps his fielders on their toes and moves the game along. But, this is really fast, in my opinion. Not that it matters, but how would you describe the level of play in his league?[/quote]

He seems to be fine from the stretch and has picked off a guy left on by a previous pitcher.

As for stepping out and putting ones hand up for time…
As soon as it’s game on - the ball is on it’s way.
“step out… i’m blowing it by you the second you step back in"
kind of mentality” There isn’t much that phases him on the mound.
He takes to heart the Steven Ellis email tips that say he’s only in control of one thing out there and fielding errors aren’t one of them. I do think he sometimes goes for the Ks when his team isn’t fielding well. I guess I would too though. Right? Or is that teaching him bad habits? He really just wants to be a “Closer.”

That is the part I like about him working fast.
I think it is more of an “intensity” aspect than a just working fast thing.
I believe it even increases the perceived speed of the pitch in a similar way as a long stride does.

At 13 the level of play is varied among plays.
Some very good and others that should be in park softball leagues for lack of a better way to put it. He is the fastest pitcher in his league and faster than the 9th grader pitchers at the HS.

I think I’m going to have him play a year up on a 14 yr old travel team in the fall. The mound is back to 60ft instead of 54, but I think playing up is better than down.

Any opinions on long toss for increasing speed and benefits of pitching bullpens at this age?

A guy he has gone to for a few pitching lessons says, “it is the BEST to increase speed,” but then again, that is how the guy makes his money.

It would be interesting to see what you think after a few games. My experience is that it’s a different world in travel ball. He just won’t be able to work that fast. Also, does he have a pitch besides a fastball? Because even at 11U if you don’t have something else then you’ll be run ruled. You just can’t throw it by the better teams.

I was wondering at what distance he was throwing…

You say he has taken some lessons?
What sort of things has the guy he’s been seeing worked on?
I usually don’t like to interfere when a kid is going to a personal coach. He’s all arm and at 60’ that “speed” will disappear. Honestly Phil, I’d go see someone else. I mean that in a charitable way…but this boy, who is very obviously determined, strong and athletic (Obviously has a great arm) needs some fundementals work in a big way. At least from the wind-up, his stretch is actually not too rough…but that wind-up is all a bunch of disjointed, wrong direction movements that will wear him out ultimately. His glove hand might just as well be paralyzed as it hangs to his side with no purpose, his stride may be what 75% of his height…his legs look wooden and don’t “flow” at all.
For all that he gets it done :shock: That my friend is a testimate to his desire and fierce competitive spirit…just think of how hot he’ll be when taught for decent and repeatable fundementals :shock: 8) …If you choose to Travel up you’ll find out very quickly what I mean
Phil you have very understandable pride in your boy…this is a simple mechanical assesment and not meant to hurt feelings…but he’s 13 and you don’t have a whole bunch of time to clean that up…he needs some work beginning now.
Here is a video of my son working some drills with his coach several years back…he was 16 at the time. Pay attention to the posture, the leg involvement, his front side (Many of the drills that day were designed for timing and posture). It’s a start…I really think he has a really great upside that is all but unexplored…

Also I am shocked that La didn’t say this…as he was the one who talked me into it…but get a tri-pod…It will be soooo handy from now on…you have much filming to do…omg I can’t wait until my grandson is this age :smiley: …you’re a lucky man…

It would be interesting to see what you think after a few games. My experience is that it’s a different world in travel ball. He just won’t be able to work that fast. Also, does he have a pitch besides a fastball? Because even at 11U if you don’t have something else then you’ll be run ruled. You just can’t throw it by the better teams.[/quote]

He throws a change-up too.
I won’t let him throw a curve.