18 y/o senior, still low eighties


#1

Hello again,
I have been working on my mechanics throughout the winter and here is where I am at now. A couple days ago I got clocked at 82, which disappointed me because that was where I was at 6 months ago. I am working at leading with my lower half more and wondering if you guys have any input. I am also wondering if it will be easier for me to become more explosive if I continue getting use to my mechanics. Thanks


#2

What other training have you had besides just mechanical work? Have you worked out in the gym with weights? What does your program look like? How long have you been throwing off of the mound?


#3

I have been in the gym 3-4 days a week throughout the off-season, i was throwing once a week up until about 4 weeks ago I gradually started throwing 5 to 6 days a week, with about 2 or 3 of those being on the mound.


#4

[quote=“travisblu”]I have been in the gym 3-4 days a week throughout the off-season, i was throwing once a week up until about 4 weeks ago I gradually started throwing 5 to 6 days a week, with about 2 or 3 of those being on the mound.[/quote]What did your workouts look like?


#5

I alternate each time, upper and lower body. A typical lower body day would look like this
4 sets of squats
3/4 sets of deadlifts
3 sets on the leg press
10 minutes of ab and core work
(hanging leg lifts, weighted sit ups, russian twists, etc.)

        Upper body: 
           4 sets of standing barbell rows
           3 sets of seated cable row
           3 sets of pull-ups to failure
           4 sets of dips
           10 minutes of ab and core work again

I usually do about 85-90 percent max weight. Last set goes to failure I didnt get the results I wanted out of the weight room, I blame this on my eating habits though and not getting enough calories. I am working to fix this though.


#6

How long is your stride? I cannot tell from this angle.

Also, how tall are you?


#7

[quote=“travisblu”]I alternate each time, upper and lower body. A typical lower body day would look like this
4 sets of squats
3/4 sets of deadlifts
3 sets on the leg press
10 minutes of ab and core work
(hanging leg lifts, weighted sit ups, russian twists, etc.)

        Upper body: 
           4 sets of standing barbell rows
           3 sets of seated cable row
           3 sets of pull-ups to failure
           4 sets of dips
           10 minutes of ab and core work again

I usually do about 85-90 percent max weight. Last set goes to failure I didnt get the results I wanted out of the weight room, I blame this on my eating habits though and not getting enough calories. I am working to fix this though.[/quote]
Do you do any explosive workouts? Such as medicine balls, sprints, etc?


#8

Low 80’s isn’t bad at all and will definitely get you into college. Just make sure you get the right exposure such as showcases.


#9

I dont really see much of a scap load from your glove side. I had the same problem for awhile after my surgery on my glove side shoulder. Once i started getting the confidence back in my surgically repaired shoulder and using it in my motion again my fastball jumped up 3-5 mph. It also eased up my arm because i was pretty much using half of my upperbody. Try working in that glove side shoulder more and gain the timing and you could see and may feel the ball coming out alot better


#10

Hello, travisblu.
Let me tell you about “THE SECRET”—something I learned a long time ago when I was really getting into pitching. In a nutshell, what it is involves getting the whole body into the action; the premise is that the lower body is the real key to a pitcher’s power. I used to go to Yankee Stadium (the original ballpark) as a kid, and I saw just how the Yankees’ legendary Big Three rotation did it. They were all driving off that lower half, using the legs, the hips and the torso in one continuous (and, it seemed to me, seamless) motion, so they were generating the power behind their pitches—even Ed Lopat, who wasn’t a fireballer. The arm and shoulder were just going along for the ride, so in doing this those three pitchers were taking a load off said arm and shoulder—and were throwing harder and faster with less effort. And not a sore arm, or a sore shoulder, or a sore elbow, or a sore anything else in the bunch!
I made a note of all this and started working on it on my own, and as I practiced this essential element of good mechanics I found that I was doing the same thing that those three pitchers were doing. I was not particularly fast, but I was throwing harder with less effort, and my natural sidearm delivery had more snap and sizzle to it.
All that weight lifting is all well and good, but I don’t see how it translates to actual pitching, You need to get on the mound and do the kind of work I described here. There are several drills and exercises you can find on this website, and one of the best is the “Hershiser drill” which aims at getting the hips fully involved. All you need for that one is a wall or a fence, and doing this particular drill will assist with posture and greater stabilization in your windup and delivery.
And that is “THE SECRET”. Learn it, use it, and it will serve you well.
8) :baseballpitcher:


#11

You say that you have been focused on your lower body to, tell me are you focusing on that in the beginning of your delivery. Are you concentrating on your lower body?


#12

yes it is a kind of a pre tense feeling. if you have lifted consistently anything above 85%… you dont come to lift 300 lbs by being loose and relaxed

its kind of like being athletically relaxed, and that is “the Secret”

reason why i give my long toss program some credit is because it makes you have to use your body to throw the ball 200+ ft… no way you can do it consistently using arm or plain bad mechanics… your body will tell you what to do if u let it


#13

When you are doing any lifting for Baseball you should be thinking about balancing the body out. You are using only one side all year you need to make the other side strong. Think one leg squats, presses with one arm . tons of rotational movement. everything should be with fast twitch muscle fibers in mind. I would look at going in a different direction with your workouts. There are lots of them out there on this web site as well. Best of luck.


#14

Thanks for all the help guys,
As for the lower body involvement, it is my main focus right now. My pitching coach is working on having me explode to the plate just after the initial leg lift.

One question though, what was McCovey referring to as far as my glove side? I understand the scap-loading process but how does my glove side tie into this?


#15

Just a warning, something that I have only recently discovered, but if you focus too much on your body moving towards the plate you can lose aggressiveness with your arm. Your arm can become “passive”, essentially you drag your arm into release. It looks very close to how a person who throws 90 would throw.

That’s what I see in your delivery, I looked over some of your previous stuff and it seems to be prevalent in each. My advice would be to simply stop focusing on your body and simply focus on your arm when you throw and let it fly.


#16

For explosiveness and improving quickness I would think you need to do hang cleans.


#17

The only thing I can see from this angle is you are confusing explosion with leg swing. You have good explosion with your leg swing and then hips, but not hips then leg swing ala Lincecum. As tall as you appear, try stepping straight back or more towards the back, instead of to the side. This way, you can generate some forward momentum with your bottom half at leg lift. Then your natural leg swing will continue your bottom half.