16U video clips

I’ll add more comments later but I think he could be more rotational and get a better scap load. He looks to be passively loading his scaps using the rotation of his shoulders to load the scaps.

I don’t see much of a step over either.

Learning how to use those hips and legs ain’t easy.

Ed

Is that an 11 oz. baseball I see in his hand? :wink:

Lower body could be a bit more aggressive, as you noted. I’ll talk to you via email.

Kyle,
I take him to a facility which utilizes a Nyman/Wolforth approach.

Looking for other drills to help him learn to use his legs and hips.

I think his scap load looks passive to me as well.

Nyman’s ebook had backwards training drills that you could use to help teach this.

Wondering if anyone out there had any drills to help with this.

I’ve read Dusty’s comments in another thread along these lines.

I read the article on Trevor Bauer where they reported he used a harness to help him learn to use the legs. I think it mentioned it helped to take the upper body out of the picture. When I’m working with him, he wants to move his shoulders before his hips, focuses heavily on upper half.

Regards,

Ed

I am a little confused on your statement about “more rotational”, I’m not understanding what you mean?

On the scap load I disagree, I see a nice scap load on video 5 at about :02 seconds I see a nice glove side toward home and a good load at that point.

I really like his stride length and tilt, little like lyncecum. Like to see him square his supporting leg up to the pitching plate in his post, I like his hip drive toward home. I would like to see him keep his head on target, this is a huge one since at this point there is no way he can effectively field his position or protect himself against the rocket back at his head. Like to see what he looks like with a batter in the box! Finally get rid of the dang radar gun, I have seen so many guys use them during lessons and unless you are looking for differences between FB and CU it’s totally worthless.

[quote=“buwhite”]I am a little confused on your statement about “more rotational”, I’m not understanding what you mean?

On the scap load I disagree, I see a nice scap load on video 5 at about :02 seconds I see a nice glove side toward home and a good load at that point.

I really like his stride length and tilt, little like lyncecum. Like to see him square his supporting leg up to the pitching plate in his post, I like his hip drive toward home. I would like to see him keep his head on target, this is a huge one since at this point there is no way he can effectively field his position or protect himself against the rocket back at his head. Like to see what he looks like with a batter in the box! Finally get rid of the dang radar gun, I have seen so many guys use them during lessons and unless you are looking for differences between FB and CU it’s totally worthless.[/quote]

I disagree on almost all of what was said here. Trying to be in a “fielding position” may take away from his velocity and intent. I really enjoy watching older pitchers fall off to the side of the mound because they are trying to throw so hard. Was watching one video where the announcers could hear the grunts of Nolan Ryan from where they were.

Also the radar gun should stay. This gives him the oppurunity to try and throw a little bit harder every time he’s working on it. Wolforth used them at his camp, challenging every player to beat their previous reading. So i don’t think i would call it “totally worthless”.

I agree about the head being down, he is working on velocity in these… hence the radar gun. Last thing I want to see is him hit in the top of the noggin.

I think his scap load seems passive to me, the rotation of the torso seems to be responsible for most of it. There is an active way and passive way to load your scaps, its been said that high level throwers use an active scap load.

I like my son’s separation but I don’t see much of a step over which tells me he could be quicker with the hips.

I’ll have to look at the posting leg… can’t view youtube here in the office.

Would love to hear some drills that teach lower half. We are aware of the Hershiser drill looking for other drills.

Maybe that SI writer was stretching things a bit but according to the article the harness really helped isolate the lower half. Would love to get a look at that.

Thanks,

Ed

beaver26, are you saying that you don’t think he should be in a position to field at all? You realize right now as a line shot would be coming back up the middle his head is looking down and to the left, the pitcher after delivery becomes another position player…sorry you disagree with me and usually I wouldn’t have a problem with it but I have seen way too many pitchers drilled becuase they either aren’t in a position to field or in some cases have their head looking at the ball to at the minimum defend themselves.

What is the point of arguing about nothing? He is throwing as hard as he knows how. Fielding position is not a part of this exercise.

I’m not trying to hijack this thread, but in regards to fielding position, there are many pitchers that don’t get into a good fielding position and some that do. The best at this being Greg Maddux. The worst probably being K-rod and Mitch williams. The main point is they are all succesful big leaguers on complete opposite ends of the fielding position spectrum.

I can see what you mean in a game situation, but i just don’t think that it is something they should focus on in a session like this.

I would imagine it’s really the only place to work on something that could and probably does affect his mechanics so dramatically, just my opinion. Thanks for the comments!

Some things I see:

(this isn’t the greatest angle for Pedro, but the main things I want to point out at this time - this should suffice -this clip is synced at the release of the ball).

The timing (when) of the handbreak (should be later), and where the hands break (breaking them lower). This “when” and “where” and the sequencing of the kinetic chain is huge when trying to develop velocity.

A lower handbreak may allow him to get a better scap load and better rotation as he throws.

A better/more aggressive move out and down with the hips is also something that as you know needs work also.

That was really great, thanks!

I like Pedro as a model for my son, although my son is taller he has some commonality with Pedro - they’re both lanky and very flexible.

What software did you use for the side by side?

Thanks for the feedback.

Besides working on his throwing 3-4 times a week, he’s working with a trainer twice a week on running speed and overall strength training. I am looking to introduce another trainer once a week who is a MMA fighter and does core, rotational and explosive type exercises. He’s training for a fight so can only do once a week right now.

Any ideas for drills to teach lower half?

Thanks again for the comments, we’ll try them tonight.

Regards,

Ed