14 year old JV player. Needs more life on fastball

these are my mechanics i need to know what to work on to gain velocity.

i play jv and need more life on my fastball.

This may seem a little bit off-topic, but I think it’s relevant: You should consider fixing up that bullpen mound before you pitch from it.

Like many mounds that are not kept in proper shape, the one you are using has a very deep hole carved out in front of the rubber.

If you watch your video again, you can see that every time after your rocker step, you look down to the rubber to make sure of where your post foot is going. Since you are stepping into a hole, that is very natural; however, on a properly groomed mound you would not need to do that.

If you practice and/or play on lots of poorly kept-up mounds, I believe you will eventually develop habits that make you “tentative” in your delivery.

ive always looked down during my step whether the mound has the hole or not, i dont know why but i just always have.

what do you think of the mechanics.

Your delivery looks fine but, regardless of why you look down to your post foot as you brace it against the front edge of the rubber, I think that it is something that you might experiment with…as in, fix the mound, and see if you can go into your delivery without looking down and hesitating before you know your post foot is set.

I obviously don’t know anything about the history of mounds you have pitched from in the past, but I’m going to hazard a guess that most of them were about as badly prepped as the one in your video clip.

Maybe I’m wrong about that, but let’s just suppose I’m right for the sake of discussion…if you developed your delivery to accommodate stepping into a hole in front of the rubber, that will impede you, in my opinion.

You are not using your right leg to push off enough. Try getting lower to the ground with your front leg before you stride, have the leg glide just above the ground instead of falling straight down… that kills your momentum towards home plate.

Flippin, once again you’re right on target!
What I used to do was get to the playing field early and see how the mound looked, and if it didn’t satisfy me I would get to work and play groundskeeper and fix it. That was one thing I didn’t want any part of—stepping into a big hole in front of the mound; if you’ve ever driven over a huge pothole in the road, you know what can happen to your tires or the suspension. That goes for bullpen mounds as well. The kid needs to get busy and fix that hole so that he will have a nice even surface to step on when he delivers the pitch, and he has to get over the habit of looking down to see where his front foot is going. :slight_smile:

What do you think of the mechanics.

I think that once the pothole in front of the mound is fixed and the pitcher has a nice stable mound to throw from the mechanics will trake care of themselves—perhaps a bit of fine-tuning, but nothing extreme.
It’ll be all right. 8)

You should take less of a rocker step and make it more of a 75 degree angle strait back then a 90 degree angle, besides that you mechanics are okay for the most part. I suggest doing band work. It has helped me greatly.

i think after followthrough phase,

ideally ~

the right leg should be parallel as left leg

Generally, I like your mechanics - I like the step-back, you have good forward momentum toward the plate, you lead well with the hip, and you do a pretty good job of keeping the back knee over the back foot. There does, however, seem to be some inconsistencies with your deliveries; at times, the sequencing looks good and at others the timing is off – so, you don’t always get to the high cocked position at the right time, and sometimes your elbow is a bit low at this position.

Personally, I don’t mind the looking down thing; you seem to pick up the target soon enough (Seaver used to do this as did Ryan, I believe). And the mound? Shoot, I’ve seen worse mounds in little league games. You need to work with what you have. If you can pitch on that mound, you’ll just enjoy the well-manicured mounds that much more when you get the chance!

My suggestion would be to hold on to the ball a bit longer - a later hand break. I like you bringing your hands up with the leg lift but try to keep them together longer as you bring them down and break at the belly button or belt buckle.

The other big things I see are:

  1. You are turning your front foot toward the plate too early - stay sideways longer.

  2. Your landing leg is not bracing up consistently well. Your knee tends to drift a bit after landing. Land with a firmed up leg and don’t let it move once you land.

  3. You are showing the ball to center field - I prefer you not turn the wrist outward like that; a natural arm swing with a neutral wrist would point the ball more toward the shortstop - 3B.

Hope that helps!

re: “And the mound? Shoot, I’ve seen worse mounds in little league games. You need to work with what you have. If you can pitch on that mound, you’ll just enjoy the well-manicured mounds that much more when you get the chance!”

—I respectfully disagree with the intention of that opinion. Pitchers deserve to pitch from a mound that is in reasonable condition. There is no rule against a pitcher and his coach asking an umpire for time between innings to fix the mound. Heck, let the opposition pitch from a bad mound and then make sure your pitcher has a good surface to work from.

I have seen mounds get dug out in front of the pitching rubber too…I’m sure most everyone at LTP has seen that more times than they wished to.

But, pitchers should not have to put up with that problem, any more than hitters should ever put up with stepping into a 2" or 3" hole as they attempt to hit the ball.

That’s why baseball fields usually have rakes, a shovel, and a tamping device–to fix glaring imperfections in the field, as they become apparent.

Yes, some elite pitchers appear to look down briefly as they go into their delivery, and some (Fernando Valenzuela comes to mind) had the disconcerting habit of looking up into the sky early in the delivery.

Whatever they were doing, it wasn’t too likely to be mound-related if they were pitching on well-kept professional baseball fields.

But, it looked to me like this kid (the OP) was looking down to find his footing as he steps into a hole. He looked tentative, as anybody would be if they were concerned about stepping into a hole while trying to perform a complex athletic motion. Stepping into a hole is not something what you want to ingrain into your pitching delivery…it won’t translate to the most effective use of a properly-kept pitcher’s mound.

The general idea, “This mound is mine when I’m using it”, is something that more pitchers should strive to incorporate into their approach. You don’t need to wait for somebody else to notice that your pitcher’s mound sucks…notice it yourself and get it taken care of.

actually even on excellent mounds i dig a hole, i like my foot in the hole with more to push off

[quote=“laflippin”]re: “And the mound? Shoot, I’ve seen worse mounds in little league games. You need to work with what you have. If you can pitch on that mound, you’ll just enjoy the well-manicured mounds that much more when you get the chance!”

—I respectfully disagree with the intention of that opinion. Pitchers deserve to pitch from a mound that is in reasonable condition. There is no rule against a pitcher and his coach asking an umpire for time between innings to fix the mound. Heck, let the opposition pitch from a bad mound and then make sure your pitcher has a good surface to work from.

I have seen mounds get dug out in front of the pitching rubber too…I’m sure most everyone at LTP has seen that more times than they wished to.

But, pitchers should not have to put up with that problem, any more than hitters should ever put up with stepping into a 2" or 3" hole as they attempt to hit the ball.

That’s why baseball fields usually have rakes, a shovel, and a tamping device–to fix glaring imperfections in the field, as they become apparent.

Yes, some elite pitchers appear to look down briefly as they go into their delivery, and some (Fernando Valenzuela comes to mind) had the disconcerting habit of looking up into the sky early in the delivery.

Whatever they were doing, it wasn’t too likely to be mound-related if they were pitching on well-kept professional baseball fields.

But, it looked to me like this kid (the OP) was looking down to find his footing as he steps into a hole. He looked tentative, as anybody would be if they were concerned about stepping into a hole while trying to perform a complex athletic motion. Stepping into a hole is not something what you want to ingrain into your pitching delivery…it won’t translate to the most effective use of a properly-kept pitcher’s mound.

The general idea, “This mound is mine when I’m using it”, is something that more pitchers should strive to incorporate into their approach. You don’t need to wait for somebody else to notice that your pitcher’s mound sucks…notice it yourself and get it taken care of.[/quote]