13yo mechanics look ok? If you all would not mind taking a look


#1

He has really been working on mechanics and we would like to know your thoughts. Anything stand out we should focus/work on?

Background: 13yo, 3/23/04, 5’11", 120 lbs, Pitching on big field, runner on 1st, slide step, 3 pitches -
fastballs. https://youtu.be/gTh2z4yaCRQ

Here is a quick video of him throwing from the windup. https://youtu.be/dFundtx0Wz0

All help appreciated very much!

Thanks!


#2

This pitcher looks tall and lanky. As such, strength would be a concern for me. I would consider keeping his workload in check - he should not be a “workhorse” type of pitcher - at least not until such time that he builds strength especially in the decelerators.


#3

Roger brought up excellent considerations. Just to add to that, at 13, with your son’s proportions, he’s going through a process where his body is trying to keep pace with his mental ambitions - thus his balance and overall motor skills will present challenges from time to time.

There’s a phrase for this age, especially with young boys -" all hands an feet". So conditioning the strength and coordination of your son will improve this grow and maturity cycle. But be careful here. Strength enhancement comes at a price. The price being paid by your son going on his own - random lifting weights in the cellar, garage without any designed purpose or limits, binge drinking and eating all kinds of weight gain products, supplements, so called health food products and so on.

A reasonable and deliberate nutrition plan is key to your son’s full potential as a athlete and his overall experience with good health.

On he flip side of all that I mentioned, will be days when he just won’t be in the mood to “be with it.” This is a normal experience while growing up. Temperamental mood swings, and even bursts of confusion and negativity are all in the mix. Just be patient.

Does your son compete in contact sports - football, hockey, lacrosse, wrestling, rugby, and the?


#4

Thank you for the responses. To answer your questions. He averages live game pitching every other weekend ±80 pitches.

Are there any decelerator exercises you would suggest Roger?

Coach: The growth spurt has happened really over the past 14 months. He seems to be getting better with coordination but at first it was a learning experience. He eats like a horse, usually several meals a day (drives my wife crazy constantly cleaning after him) and he’s really not a junk food or soda drinker. Drinks a ton of water and almost every night will have a bowl of ice cream. Has been in the ±120lb range for 4-5 months now.

I have him working out 3 times a week on his own, mostly core stuff, squat machine, bench press (we have a weighted pulley gym), lunges, med ball over head throws, etc. He has been getting stronger lately it seems…

Other then pick up basketball games with friends, no other sports. Wife has him scared (rightfully so or not) to play tackle football.

He seems to have really taken a liking to pitching. I have been his pitching coach at home (I went and got a 10" portable mound) and practice at field, as I played baseball (pitcher as well) into my later years. I have been a member of this forum since earlier this year and have learned many things as well that we have implemented. Thanks to forum!

We are at the point now, where if he wants to pursue baseball into high school next year I think I really need to get him a pitching coach as I feel I can no longer provide insight. It’s past me at this point and feel like I have no more to offer him…plus it’s been difficult lately being a Dad/Coach providing what I think are tips, pointers, tweaks…which he sometimes views as criticisms. Makes the end experience of a pitching session sometimes very tense between us and not enjoyable.

Thank you for all your help…

If you see anytime in his mechanics, or anything else we should pay attention to, I’m all ears:)


#5

I would suggest two types of exercise for the decelerators. The first type would be elastic tubing exercises. This video does a nice job demonstrating a good set of exercises (I have no affiliation with k-bands):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWP7WJTMpGE

The other exercise I would recommend is the towel drill using a baseball stuffed in a tube sock instead of a towel. Perform the towel drill (google “towel drill” to find a Tom House video on the drill) using the ball in the sock and without letting go of the ball. This will force the decelerators to decelerate the weight of the ball in addition to the weight of the arm. And make sure not to let go of the ball as you’ll kill the person holding the target. :wink:


#6

Thanks Roger! Good Stuff…

What are your thoughts on reverse weighted ball throws for decelerator strength?

Is there anything in his mechanics that warrants concern for you? Should we make any adjustments?

Thanks again for the valued input…


#7

You’ll have to explain what reverse weighted ball throws are.

As for mechanics, the one thing that jumps out at me is what appears to be a pulling back of the glove. Pulling the glove back usually results in early shoulder rotation which can affect both performance and health. Unfortunately, the “pull the glove” teach is quite common. Please see my comments in the thread on Severe bicep muscle pain.


#8

Thanks Roger for the advice. Reverse weighted ball throws as used by Driveline - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1AUF2tKP6wo


#9

Circling back to my original question…any other thoughts on his mechanics from anyone would be helpful to us (good or bad)?


#10

Erik, since I’m not able to see the video, says it’s not available, I agree with Coach and Roger. Although as far as strength training for a Pitcher, I recommend Tuffcuff by Steve Ellis or follow him @Steveellis. I use it with my College Pitchers, it’s a great Off Season and In Season Strength and Conditioning Program. If you could resend the video I would be happy to look it over. You could also get some great tips by the leading Pitching Gurus in the World, Lance Wheeler at Baseballthinktank.com and Tom House, very good videos on You Tube. Good luck with your son, please keep us updated on how he’s progressing.


#11

As said in the post above me, I also really like TuffCuff and also recommend it.