13 yo warming up in pen


#1


I need to get a different angle, side etc. This is all I have right now. Anything standout as needing a fix from this shot?


#2

Kind of tough to tell from this angle but it looks like you stall over the back foot at the top of your knee lift and then your front leg leads from that point forward. I’d prefer to stay see more continuous movement and leading more with the front hip. I believe this would allow for better use of your lower half at the beginning of your delivery and better total body involvement after that. Google “Hershiser drill”.


#3

Thank you Roger, started doing that drill. Thank you SP, and Coach B for the great feedback. Here is some footage from the side. See anything different with this view?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eHEb9MRUd4A&feature=youtu.be


#4

The thing to work on first is almost aways that which happens earliest in the delivery. Having said that, I don’t believe the front leg must be straight. What’s important is that the forward linear movement of the hips is abruptly stopped to efficiently transfer energy to the next link in the kinetic chain. That can be accomplished through muscle activation on a bent front leg. Of course, that demonstrates the need for proper strength in the front leg.

Planting on a straight front leg allows the skeleton to carry more of the load while, IMHO, sending more of a jolt through the joints - especially the hips.


#5

Two fairly elite pitchers on bent front leg. :slight_smile:


#6

pthawaii
If you can manage what Roger just posted, that quality of movement will stay with you for the rest of your pitching career. His advice is THEE key to holding control and momentum - all in balance with the chain of events that your body will go through as you deliver, regardless if your going through the stretch or set.

Pitchers that incur some sort in injury, regardless how small, find this controlled forward motion to be the most difficult part of their comeback.

I would suggest taking Roger’s advice and practice in slow motion to get the feel, each and every part of the way as you see it. Increase your momentum until it feels second nature to you. Also, don’t overlook the surface that you’re pitching off of. That surface can force you to ALTER your perception and feel of what you practiced on a quality surface. In addition, your practice on a level surface can, and will, give you a totally different impression of what you should be learning.

With mounds that are literally junk, try practicing on the back side of these mounds. You’d be surprised at how quickly you’ll learn what a surface will do to you. Go from a good surface (back side) to the front, and make adjustments to that surface with your cleats, conditioning it to work for you, not against you.

I’m not a mechanics coach, but I can tell you that in your video your do look very strong and with great potential. So, work on what Roger suggested in addition - start with a solid nutrition foundation, set priorities for yourself with academics and other qualities of life.


#7

I mentioned BALANCE throughout my last post and I’d like to expand on that point here.

Regardless how bent, or not, your front leg is, there’s a reason for each pitcher conducting his overall motion and momentum. Take a look at the pitcher below and you’ll see a definite bend in his stride leg at the end of his release cycle. You’ll also notice how well he balances himself off in order to control his ending posture, thus putting a control impression on his pitch. This ending posture is not shear happenstance or “it’s just there.” He’s worked very hard to control his body as he progresses down the mound and end his body in a posture that impresses balance, overall and completely.

Notice that his stride leg is somewhat bend, ending his finish -but, he didn’t just consider that as an end in itself. He used his pivot leg as a balance weight, with a center point of his overall extensions - front shoulder, ending arms and so forth, in the midsection just above his beltline.

Now regardless of the different ending finish that a pitcher has, those that can control themselves all use this weight proportion in their total progress - from set up to delivery.

Adding to what I’ve already mentioned, some pitchers actually bend their stride leg with a very pronounced bend, then use the knee as a hinge to right the lower portion of their body up a bit when ending their delivery posture. These guys have a great deal of muscular strength in the core. Take a look at the pitcher below and you’ll see how his body is not only balance with proportion, but he went from a stride leg bend to an extension of that bend.

For those pitchers that have a more upright posture in their finish, their stride leg is bent slightly but they still maintain a body posture that balances themselves off, while rising up from a more pronounced bending of the stride leg.

You’ll have to fine tune and decide what works best for your overall strength and progressive maturity. Just be mindful of the purpose for every move and direction that you take during your overall body’s chain of movement.


#8

Thank you Roger, started doing that drill. Thank you SP, and Coach B for the great feedback. Here is some footage from the side. See anything different with this view?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eHEb9MRUd4A&feature=youtu.be