12 year old slow mo video


Hope this works!!
This is my son Aj,he just turned 12,any comments or suggestions would be great.
Thanks

Anything at all??

Calm downnnn, it’s only been a day 8) these things can take some time. One thing that really sticks out is his finish, it looks extremely forced. You don’t want to tell him to finish like that. The finish isn’t a teach, it’s a reaction to the back leg powerfully driving the body forward. If you tech him to move forward faster and quicker, the finish takes care of itself. The other thing I see is like most young pitchers he breaks his hands early and takes them straight back and up. His arm is ready well before the body is. Make his hand break occur after the weight shift, this will help use his body more and get the arm involved later. Good luck!

How do you instruct kids to prevent this? It is something I see a lot and this from our better pitchers.

Thanks for the input!:slight_smile: We were working on his finish that week,he would never finish his pitches in the flat back position so thats probably why it looks forced. Also,he was throwing into a wall net,he gets so into throwing strikes,he can’t consentrate on what were working on,also he slows everything down to guarantee a strike!
How long into the weight shift should he wait to break his hands?
He starts his hip to the plate,then the hands break,should it be much later?

Thanks

Man,what a long first post,thanks. I believe there is no,ONE RIGHT WAY to pitch! There are hundreds of people that believe in one type,and visa versa. Im just here for friendly advise,not to buy into a System,thank you for your input. If i were to try to model after anyone’s teachings,it would probably be
Dick Mills.
Aj has zero pain,and awesome control while pitching,his change up,is about 8-10 Mph off his fastball. Our issues are many,but the main thing we are working on is trying to get him to speed up his drive to the plate.
He drives hard in practice,but during games,he slows to make sure he hits his spots!
I probably should have included game video along with the practice video.
If you read my other post,you would know we were working on his finish,and he was throwing into a wall net,his in game delivery is different.
Thanks for the input

Also just because a guy plays MLB does not mean his mechanics are sound,and is how I want my son to pitch!!!
There are some with very good mechanics,and there are some that throw,or threw 95-100Mph,that have had surgery because of their mechanics!!
If you have a certain MLB players mechanics in mind,please just use his name.
Thanks

He does a lot of really good things, particularly with his lower half.

The big thing is definitely his arm being up in the high-cocked position way too early. Since the video is in slo-mo, it isn’t possible to see his actual speed of movement; if he speeds up his body, he may very well correct the early arm position.

He may also want to work on his arm movements a bit. First thing I would suggest is to start with his throwing arm in closer to his body, so that it mirrors his glove arm. I also like the hands/arms to move in synch with the leg - as the leg goes up, the arms go up and when the leg comes down, the arms come down.

The bottom line is he needs to do something to change the timing so that his arm gets up there later. His arm swing is a quicker pendulum type action as opposed to the “elbow lifter” who takes more time to get up into the high-cocked position. I am not advocating one over the other, but it is another way to delay the arm.

One other comment - his back foot seems to move around a bit as he is lifting his leg; make sure that is firmly planted throughout.

Otherwise, I think he looks fantastic!

We are trying so hard to speed up his drive to the plate,i think he was almost jumping with his leg lift :slight_smile: we got that settled down soon after that video was taken.
Thanks for the input

When my son was 10, we started with no leg lift - just driving hard from the get go. His timing was great and he moved extremely fast. You might want to consider trying it and seeing if that helps. It wasn’t too difficult to transition into a leg lift later on (when he was 14).

Oh, one more thing I should mention with your son: he seems a bit “sandwiched” with his torso. Get him to stay upright from leg lift to landing rather than crunching forward and then getting upright.

We worked on his"crunches" also:)
He does throw from the Slidestep,and it is a little faster,but he says his elbow hurts when he pitches from the Slidestep! Looked like his arm was lagging,thats when he got used to haveing his hands,and glove on the front side of his chest,and not the center.

Sorry if the replys dont make sense,think the guy plugging his website got the Boot!

I won’t comment too much on the video, but rather at what you should be look for when you look at MLB clips.

What I look for:

-high velocity
-shorter in stature-generally more efficient mechanics(for example Trevor Bauer, Craig Kimbral)
-position at foot plant(hips open almost completely, back foot begins dragging because of drive down the mound, torso is closed.
-Position at max ER

I compare myself to these aspects that I see. What you find is that those things I mentioned(the last to -'s) are pretty uniform with all high velocity Major leaguers

Everyone will do it a little different, but there trends and similarities that you can find with most guys

I have to agree with everyone else so far. He get’s to the “high-cocked” position too early. My son also used to do this and I just had him do multiple reps of stopping after his stride to check his hand positions. I had him attempt to get to where his glove was up and out front with his throwing arm closer to down than up (elbow at 90 degree angle or close to it) with both shoulders still in-line with his target and hips starting to open. This drill is pretty good in helping teach hip-shoulder separation as well. Once he gets this down you should see that 56mph fastball jump to 65mph!

That video plays too herky-jerky for me to comment on it. But I’ll comment on some of the other comments here.

First, the comments about the finish being a result of other things is dead on. Don’t work on the finish - let it happen. But use it as an indicator. If it doesn’t look right (and be careful with what you consider “right”), figure out what it was upstream in the delivery that needs work.

Timing of the hand break can effectively be changed by moving forward sooner and faster. Timing of individual movements within the delivery are relative to each other.

Personally, since folks feel there is a need to move forward sooner/faster, I would have him work on that before even considering working on anything else because many times an improvement in tempo cleans up timing and movement patterns of other parts of the delivery. Consider using the Hershiser drill as part of this work.

He could use a bit more forward leg tilt. As he gets to the top of the lift, leading with the front hip could give him more momentum and speed down the hill. A later and more forceful hand break will actually speed up the rest of his delivery and help give his lower half time to finish.

[quote=“structuredoc”]He does a lot of really good things, particularly with his lower half.

The big thing is definitely his arm being up in the high-cocked position way too early. Since the video is in slo-mo, it isn’t possible to see his actual speed of movement; if he speeds up his body, he may very well correct the early arm position…The bottom line is he needs to do something to change the timing so that his arm gets up there later…One other comment - his back foot seems to move around a bit as he is lifting his leg; make sure that is firmly planted throughout.

Otherwise, I think he looks fantastic![/quote]

[quote=“Roger”]…First, the comments about the finish being a result of other things is dead on. Don’t work on the finish - let it happen. But use it as an indicator. If it doesn’t look right (and be careful with what you consider “right”), figure out what it was upstream in the delivery that needs work.

Timing of the hand break can effectively be changed by moving forward sooner and faster. Timing of individual movements within the delivery are relative to each other.

…an improvement in tempo cleans up timing and movement patterns of other parts of the delivery. Consider using the Hershiser drill as part of this work.[/quote]

I also agree with this assessment. Additionally, I like his glove side action, his front leg bracing and the position of his torso at release look good. He seems to rotate well around his glove side. I can’t get a good read on hip /shoulder separation, but a look from the rear might be helpful.

He seems to stride down the target line, which is great.

After release it looks like he’s going to transition into a cart wheel or something :wink: Perhaps a more powerful back leg drive will give him a bit more stride length without any extra reaching with the front leg. If he’s longer in the stride (through extra back leg drive), perhaps his weight won’t get so far out in front of him at the end.

Overall the biggest problems I see are lack of early forward momentum, the early L position in his throwing arm, and that follow through.


This is the regular speed version of the clip if it helps.


Newest video!!


Newest video from the front.
It called “the leaner”
:slight_smile:
Thanks for the input!!

  1. arm gets cocked too early…before foot strike. His arm speed will be reduced because he has to wait for his lower body to catch up. His lower body is slow due to the exaggerated leg lift. He’s lifting so high, his pivot foot is almost coming off the ground.
  2. he’s getting no legs or hips into his delivery…he’s all upper body. A powerful leg drive will also help him get his stride on the target line and further toward home plate which will help him not fall forward after release and helping to fix #3.
  3. he’s leaning to the first base side because his plant is on the 3rd base side of the target line (that crease in the rug…his foot is centered on it in the set position, but his entire foot lands to the 3rd base side of it at foot strike) His body leans toward 1st base to get the throw back on target. Fix the strike position and the lean will go away.