12 year old mechanics


#1

it’s time to start the season and me and my son are working on final tweaks to his mechanics. i would appreciate any input.

my concerns are:

  1. his back foot is off the ground slightly when he releases the ball. in the past this has spelled high misses.
  2. his hip action just worries me. not sure what’s going on here. maybe he’s turning his back too far?
  3. late arm action and not quite into high cocked position at foot plant.

i know everybody needs to work with the body they have and their mechanics can differ from others, but i want to make sure he is doing the best with what he has…lest he get injured.


#2

i know it doesn’t look like it from the video, but he is pitching from a mound. he actually does better from flat ground though.


#3

this is my video (i’m his father). just want to make sure that what i’m doing isn’t throwing him off.


#4

i found the video we posted last year looking for help and it appears he has the same issues. lol

we will work on the stuff that worked last year and try to figure out how he got out of the good mechanics in the first place.


#5

tuck the glove under the left arm. you dont want your right arm going over the top of it like that. It cuts down the power you get from a hip turn.


#6

i’m really more worried about having that glove in a place where it might stop a fastball to the face.


#7

Tucked under neath his pitching arm in front of his body isn’t going to help that, I agree with RNich34 that the glove side mechanics need to be worked on, it balances the muscle action of the body, makes it easier to get power from the hip turn and gets you using both sides of the body for power.


#8

First thing I would do is have your son bend his knees and waiste to lower his center of gravity. Then I’d have him get his butt moving forward sooner. And I’d keep an eye on his posture and make him keep his head upright/eyes level.


#9

we are working on the suggestions you guys made. thank you so much. he just got picked as the number one choice pitcher for his league (mostly due to velocity and location). but we will be working to make the changes permanent.

Nicolas has a question:

does it make a difference if your back foot is on the ground and your front leg is bent when you release the ball?

from seeing how he misses, i think it does make a difference and the back foot should be on on the ground at release.


#10

Not a pitching coach, nor did I stay in a Holiday Inn last night, but…I’m pretty sure my son’s coach would say his arm is starting way to low, he’s pitching up hill. Costing him velocity and potentially leading to injury.


#11

yeah, my son likes Tim Lincecum and tries to do the arm dangle…which kills his timing.

i’m trying to get him to throw more like Roy Oswalt, i think the mechanics are more solid for the average kid.


#12

[quote=“singtall”]yeah, my son likes Tim Lincecum and tries to do the arm dangle…which kills his timing.

i’m trying to get him to throw more like Roy Oswalt, i think the mechanics are more solid for the average kid.[/quote]

During warm up tosses, my son does an exaggerated Lincecum imitation for five pitches or so, then returns to his regular stuff. He has no way of controlling the pitch, and only a fraction of the velocity. He’s got the action down fairy well, though. For a boy it’s fun to imitate your hero, but he knows there is only one Lincecum


#13

He just needs to follow through. There’s no follow through at all.

It all looks fine up to the release, then right after it he stops pretty abruptly.

If you have to do a drill, then try the towel drill. Hold your glove around his knee level near his plane of delivery and hit it there a couple times. Then move it out and up to point more at the release.


#14

[quote=“singtall”]Nicolas has a question:

does it make a difference if your back foot is on the ground and your front leg is bent when you release the ball?

from seeing how he misses, i think it does make a difference and the back foot should be on on the ground at release.[/quote]

First get a follow through cause I bet it just erases the question. Anyway some things like that are only problems while they’re on your mind.

But when you follow through hard your leg is gonna be swinging up and out much more deliberately while it matches everything above your hips coming down and left.

So your foot/toe will automatically be doing what it needs to, either to to maintain whatever amount of balance you need at that point, or to come loose while your body goes around.


#15

we have been working on releasing out front and throwing from a bent glove side knee.

i had to show him some freeze frame pics of Lincecum to convince him that he needs to throw from a bent knee and release out front before his back leg goes into the air. all he cared about was posting the front leg straight and finishing with a high back leg, neither of which was helping him follow through.