12-30 New video: COLLEGE LEFTY NEEDS HELP WITH MECHANICS


#1

Just recorded this one of me throwing full speed. It was cold, but nonetheless, better video than before.
Please help me with my mechanics. Any possible drills and backwards chaining things I can do? I still got a month so anything to help would be awesome.

Thanks a bunch


#2

What I see is the biggest issue is in your arm action (like many others here).

You “push” the ball.

Where I slow down the clip, you have about 3 frames where your arm get’s up too early, and you loose any scapular loading that you may have built up. This energy “leak” causes the beginning of the whip action (kinetic sequencing or kinetic chain) to break down. This leaves you with about 3 frames where your arm is just basically coasting along waiting for you to push it through release.

Your lower half you could use a little better loading of the rear hip as you move out. You need to “sit” deeper into footplant and ultimately get that momentum to transfer up through your core into your arm.


#3

[quote=“101mph”]

What I see is the biggest issue is in your arm action (like many others here).

You “push” the ball.

Where I slow down the clip, you have about 3 frames where your arm get’s up too early, and you loose any scapular loading that you may have built up. This energy “leak” causes the beginning of the whip action (kinetic sequencing or kinetic chain) to break down. This leaves you with about 3 frames where your arm is just basically coasting along waiting for you to push it through release.

Your lower half you could use a little better loading of the rear hip as you move out. You need to “sit” deeper into footplant and ultimately get that momentum to transfer up through your core into your arm.[/quote]

That’s cool how you got the frames next to eachother. What would you suggest I do to work on this? Is this a result from breaking my hands too early, or not taking the ball out correctly? Thanks for the help man


#4

[quote=“rawchip”][quote=“101mph”]

What I see is the biggest issue is in your arm action (like many others here).

You “push” the ball.

Where I slow down the clip, you have about 3 frames where your arm get’s up too early, and you loose any scapular loading that you may have built up. This energy “leak” causes the beginning of the whip action (kinetic sequencing or kinetic chain) to break down. This leaves you with about 3 frames where your arm is just basically coasting along waiting for you to push it through release.

Your lower half you could use a little better loading of the rear hip as you move out. You need to “sit” deeper into footplant and ultimately get that momentum to transfer up through your core into your arm.[/quote]

That’s cool how you got the frames next to eachother. What would you suggest I do to work on this? Is this a result from breaking my hands too early, or not taking the ball out correctly? Thanks for the help man[/quote]

It could be as simple as you breaking your hands a little later. Timing and rhythm problems (that cause other problems) aren’t as easy to correct as you might think.

After looking at the clip more I will clarify my last analysis by saying your pushing the ball is more what I would call a “pie thrower”, because the pushing is when your arm is up so high and it occurs later in the throw (in the last few frames before release).

You want to do some drills that isolate your arm action. Something where you only throw with your arm (from various points in your delivery).

Do one where your hands are apart (in an athletic position standing sideways to your target), then take a small “slide step” and throw. Then progress to something where you end up with your hands together as when your are in a set position.

Break it up into 3 or 4 sections (from release all the way back to hand break from a set position). You’ll need to check yourself on video as you work on this to see if you are moving in the right direction.

Don’t expect this to correct itself very quickly. It may take 5 or 10,000 quality reps before you see any improvement.


#5

[quote=“101mph”][quote=“rawchip”][quote=“101mph”]

What I see is the biggest issue is in your arm action (like many others here).

You “push” the ball.

Where I slow down the clip, you have about 3 frames where your arm get’s up too early, and you loose any scapular loading that you may have built up. This energy “leak” causes the beginning of the whip action (kinetic sequencing or kinetic chain) to break down. This leaves you with about 3 frames where your arm is just basically coasting along waiting for you to push it through release.

Your lower half you could use a little better loading of the rear hip as you move out. You need to “sit” deeper into footplant and ultimately get that momentum to transfer up through your core into your arm.[/quote]

That’s cool how you got the frames next to eachother. What would you suggest I do to work on this? Is this a result from breaking my hands too early, or not taking the ball out correctly? Thanks for the help man[/quote]

It could be as simple as you breaking your hands a little later. Timing and rhythm problems (that cause other problems) aren’t as easy to correct as you might think.

After looking at the clip more I will clarify my last analysis by saying your pushing the ball is more what I would call a “pie thrower”, because the pushing is when your arm is up so high and it occurs later in the throw (in the last few frames before release).

You want to do some drills that isolate your arm action. Something where you only throw with your arm (from various points in your delivery).

Do one where your hands are apart (in an athletic position standing sideways to your target), then take a small “slide step” and throw. Then progress to something where you end up with your hands together as when your are in a set position.

Break it up into 3 or 4 sections (from release all the way back to hand break from a set position). You’ll need to check yourself on video as you work on this to see if you are moving in the right direction.

Don’t expect this to correct itself very quickly. It may take 5 or 10,000 quality reps before you see any improvement.[/quote]

Yea I would def like to work on my arm action. Could you possibly provide more detail for the drills above and maybe any clips you know of with backwards chaining? I’ve been trying to find them on here.


#6

Man you look just like I used to look. You have it, you just haven’t realized it yet. You have to learn how to relax at foot plant. Its that simple. Stay closed, meaning you land with your right elbow basically pointing at the target, and then whip that arm through and as far out towards the target as you can, with your weight shifting hard and over that front foot, which is done by exploding off that back foot. It’s ridiculous how similiar we look. I’m 6’3 200 lb. You look about the same. How tall are you, and more importantly, have you taken advantage of the fact your left handed and worked on holding base runners. I mean more than just pick off moves, I mean being able to mess with runners and slowly apex that knee, maintaining balance, and being able to throw over to either second or first on command?


#7

Wow that’s pretty crazy. I’m about 5’11 close to 6 and about 175. I feel like I hold runners pretty well and have always had a pretty good move, sometimes picking off a few runners a game. Is the slow knee lift your talking about supposed to go either towards the bag or to the plate, or do you always set in your mind which way youre going? And if you go to the plate with a slow deliberate leg lift, isn’t your delivery going to suffer in velocity and control?


#8

Prior to the advice that you’ve received thus far, what has been your strike % (quality) with the following:

The reason why I ask, your current form lends itself to poor strike % dependency in the upper right and lower left of the strike zone(s) as boxed in below. Usually - not all, LH pitchers with your style have a tendency to be surgical with your locations (4seam) upper left and lower right of the box(s). And although this tends to build confidence to some degree, it also shifts predictability to a higher percentage of “waiting a pitcher out” by the batter when pitches are heading in those directions of lesser accuracy - for you as I mentioned above.

Like I mentioned, not all pitchers have this tendency - just a higher percentage than usual, when the pitching arm has your kind of delivery phase.

101mph gave you some very solid advice - I’d study his reasoning. The why-n-what-for is worth noting in a notebook and taking to the field. Allow someone else to critique you as you try and put this advice of 101mph to use.

By the way, what has bee reviewed by 101mph is not causal stuff - it’s serious progression analysis. Don’t try and review and work when your not rested and fully aware of the goal(s) that you’ll be trying to accomplish. This advice is not for the novice who’s just out for a spin at the park. Be well rested, alert and ready to work. Then come back with more video and let 101mph take you the next step. Don’t go bouncing around from suggestion to suggestion - stick with one (101mph) ask “how’s this now”, and so forth. I say this because your size, age and athletic demeanor tells me that you could go a lot farther with just a little more work on staying healthy with your delivery phase ( as 101mph as suggested).

Coach B.


#9

Well the leg lift until apex is slow because it gives you time to gather your balance and allow for the decision to go to second, first, or home on command; depending on if any runners have taken an early second lead or have just taken off trying to steal on you, you can throw to second or first. It’s rather difficult and takes a lot of practice, but its what I do and I stop the running game. Now when you decide to go to the plate, you are at lead knee apex, and you then just do your thing. You go out closed sideways as fast as you can and explode your hips open at the target, followed by your stomach, chest, and finally your arm. The last feeling you should have is that wrist action out front as you whip the ball out of your hand.