11u Mechanics


#1

Feel free to offer comments or suggestions on my 11 year old son’s mechanics…thanks.


#2

Rushing a bit: Early getting to cocked position and you are actually beginning to release some of your upper body torque before foot strike.
It seems your head is tilted a bit far to the first base side. Difficult to see exactly how much from this angle.

Lots of good things too:
I like your forward momentum, your stride looks good, although you land a bit on the heel.
Personally, I like to see a pitcher land on the bottom of the foot. Many land toe first, many land heel first without much trouble. I think it’s easier to get braced on a bottom of the foot landing.
You have good external rotation and forearm layback.
Good follow through.

I think with working on the two things I’ve pointed out you can get more velocity. Keeping your throwing arm parallel to the ground until your stride foot begins to touch will force your arm to move faster. It will also allow you to conserve more of your upper body torque–which will really have an impact. Landing flat on your stride foot will help you get forward, allowing for better trunk flexion and follow through and will also move your release point closer to the plate.


#3

Thank you for your comments. Yes he definitely has been working on his posture and “staying tall” with his pitching coach but still tilts his head towards first base under maximum effort. He usually lands flat-footed but I will keep an eye on this. I think he may have been striding maybe just a bit further than usual knowing that the camera was rolling.

As for the rushing you referred to…do you think a later hand break would help with this? Can you describe in more detail how he can fix this? Thanks again for your help.

John


#4

I have been to many different coaches but they all say the same thing. I noticed his left leg when he plants it to throw the left leg is still bent, If you plant your left leg and straiten it out after he plants it almost like a whipping motion it will help his body stop faster creating more momentum coming forward like a whip. Look at his front leg it is straight not bent when he plants it. And the pitcher follows through with a straightened leg


#5

Later hand break can help, but his issue seems to be that he doesn’t extend the throwing arm back fully before raising it. In the delivery, everything is fractions of a second. Reaching back to be opposite of his glove arm extension may sync him up.


#6

I see a lack of “hip & shoulder separation” - the shoulders rotate at the same time as the hips instead of after the hips. I feel this is due to poor timing of “equal & opposite”. Maintaining “equal & opposite” until front foot plant (or as close to it as possible) allows the shoulders to stay closed longer. But, by front foot plant, your son’s glove arm has already swiveled over and his glove has lowered. Get him to keep the glove arm in an “equal & opposite” position until as close to front foot plant as possible. The towel drill would be a good choice to practice getting a feel for this.

One other thing your son can do to help with his timing is to start his center of mass moving forward sooner and more aggressively to get into front foot plant sooner. Consider using the Hershiser drill to practice this.


#7

Pretty much exactly what I pointed out as well.


#8

Fairly good mechanics, but he cocks his arm too early. He also needs to work on moving early on the leg lift and moving down and out at the same rate instead of down then out. Overall pretty nice mechanics keep up the good work!


#9

Thanks for the comments and suggestions. We will try to incorporate your advice in the future. Have a great day!


#10

I’m not going to say it’s perfect but he does have some hip to shoulder seperation. I personally do t believe in equal and opposite and I believe a more dynamic lower half will help. Getting more linear and driving even harder of the back leg we’ll help this, along with a bit of scapular load.