11 yr old pitcher. please help analyze


#1

I would appreciate any help with analyzing my son’s pitching mechanics.

I hope to get a rear view up soon.

He has decent velocity but lacks control right now. I’m trying to teach him to be consistent.

Also I’m a little worried his elbow is a little low when he starts to come forward with his throw. I’ve been told the elbow should be at least shoulder height.


#2

#3

he’s losing a fair bit of velocity and control due to the fact his elbow is so low during his forward stride.

Also, the pause in his throwing arm right before he strides is causing him to lose additional control and velocity.

You could try and get him to slow down his delivery and practice balancing at the top of his motion because it looks to me like he’s rushing his delivery causing some velocity and control loss.

Also, upon release he looks to be leaning back where as his momentum should be carrying him forward if that makes sense. Getting him to lean more toward the target could result in better control.


#4

Generally, I like this young man’s mechanics. Only some very minor adjustments suggested below.

[quote=“Pheen”]…the pause in his throwing arm right before he strides is causing him to lose additional control and velocity.[/quote]I agree. There should be no pause in the delivery once it begins.

[quote=“Pheen”]You could try and get him to slow down his delivery and practice balancing at the top of his motion because it looks to me like he’s rushing his delivery causing some velocity and control loss.[/quote]Sorry Pheen but I have to disagree wholeheartedly on this one. This pitcher is not rushing. I contend he’s doing just the opposite. Not only does his arm hesitate but the rest of his body does also, right at the top of his knee lift. The dreaded “balance point”. I also believe this could be part of why he hesitates with his arm. It’s up there, ready to go but the rest of the body hasn’t caught up yet, so it waits.

I suggest that, if he were to lose the balance point pause and get his centre of gravity going earlier and a bit more quickly, the arm pause may just take care of itself.

[quote=“Pheen”]Also, upon release he looks to be leaning back where as his momentum should be carrying him forward if that makes sense. Getting him to lean more toward the target could result in better control.[/quote]Again, I believe his lack of momentum toward the plate is the root cause of things. Roger could also chime in about his posture issues.


#5

The first thing I noticed is that his wind-up delivery is really a combination of a normal wind-up and stretch deliveries. He starts off facing 3rd base but he still takes a step backward. I don’t think that’s illegal but I suppose it’s possible some umpires might not be use to seeing that and saying it is.

If you let him continue to use that delivery, I would recommend that he not open up toward home plate when he takes that step back. Right now, he opens up a bit and then closes back up when he lifts his knee. This creates a lot of unnecessary movement.

I don’t really see a problem with his arm slot. I certainly don’t see a low elbow. Instead I see a very over-top-top arm slot that is due to him tilting his head and leaning to the glove side. This is a posture issue that I’d recommend fixing by having him keep his head upright through release.

He does need more tempo and to build more momentum so that he gets out over the front foot more. I like to see the front foot, front knee, and chin alligned vertically at release with the release point out in front of the front foot.

Now having said all that, keep in mind that your son is very young and may lack the functional strength to do all of these things well. That’s ok. Just keep working at it and it will come in time.

I really like what he does with his glove. He puts it out front, turns it over as the shoulders rotate, and brings his chest to the glove. Very nice.


#6

You guys are awesome. I appreciate all of your feedback.

I never noticed the hesitation until you guys pointed it out. I’m working with him now to keep a fluid motion.

I’m working with him to go to a traditional wind up facing the catcher.

I’m also getting him to stand up tall and make sure his head doesn’t lean towards the side.

Again thank you for your comments.


#7

Keeping the head upright and standing up tall are two different things. I see a lot of young kids stand straight up and down and then the first move they make when they start their delivery is to bend the knees and hunch forward at the waist. All they’re doing is adjusting to a more athletic position that they have the core strength to maintain throughout their delivery. But those initial adjustments are also unnecessary movements that can be eliminated. So, it’s ok to start with the knees bent a little and a slight bend at the waist. What ever he does, he can and should still keep the head upright. IMHO.


#8

Some things I observed:

  1. It’s hard to tell from the video angle but it seems that his front foot lands 1st base side which may give him the tendency to open up and to throw glove side (outside to a right handed batter). This may or may not be what you mean by “control problem.” You may want to experiment with the front foot landing i.e., straight path to the plate.

  2. The rear foot has a tendency to drag behind which may indicate that his front leg is bent too much and needs to brace itself to bring his hips around and subsequently the rear leg. I think the hesitation that others have cited may contribute to this due to the lack of momentum going forward.


#9

[quote=“Papibon”]The rear foot has a tendency to drag behind…[/quote]The rear foot drag this pitcher displays is OK. It’s the result of good hip rotation. In the pros, you’ll have a harder time finding pitchers who don’t do this than who do.


#10

[quote]the rear foot drag this pitcher displays is OK. It’s the result of good hip rotation. In the pros, you’ll have a harder time finding pitchers who don’t do this than who do.
[/quote]

It shouldn’t drag all the way to his landing foot. I can’t think of any pros who drag the rear foot that far…maybe Gooden. Sometimes the boy’s foot drags and comes off the ground and sometimes it doesn’t. I’m addressing the latter.