10yr old sore arm


#1

My son had an intense pitching lesson last Sunday. His arm has been sore since. The pain is on the side of his arm. It runs from bottom of his shoulder to just above the elbow. Dr thinks he just over did it but I’m concerned due to the amount if time that has passed and it is painful. Thank you.


#2

I don’t think anyone here is going to argue with what your doctor said as most of us aren’t doctors. That being said, a kid sometimes doesn’t know how to determine what is an “ache” vs “pain” and there is huge difference. I know from playing ball for a long time that I’ve overworked my arm and not thrown for about a week and a half before being almost soreness/pain free. I wouldn’t worry about it, just have him lightly stretching and icing and it should be okay but if the problem persists for a few more weeks or when whenever he throws go see your doctor again.

Also, stress to him not to get back out there and go 100% he needs to ease himself back into it so that he doesn’t go do the same thing.


#3

Would be interested in hearing what is meant by “an intense pitching lesson”.


#4

Shut him down for a couple of weeks at least, see how it is then with some light throwing and work up from there.


#5

He had my son doing a lot of drills. They use a “stick” that he whips. He has my son go through his pitching motion step by step, once he shows proper mechanics he finishes with the stick. (not sure if I’m explaining it right). He has been doing this for a few weeks with no problems. My son began throwing and was throwing harder than I’d ever seen. After they finished he complained his arm was sore and we shut him down.

I think the problem was made worse while he was in school. He told the PE coach his arm was sore but the coach made him do push ups and other things. We got a DR note so he is excused from PE. Hopefully rest will be the remedy.

One question. Should I ice or apply heat? It has been about 9 days since the soreness began


#6

At this point, I don’t think ice will provide any benefit unless there is swelling/inflamation. After 9 days, I would think the pain would have subsided if it was due just to overworking the muscles. If the pain is in or around a joint, you might want to start thinking about having him checked out by a sports med doctor.


#7

I would like to know more about this stick that he whips? Never heard of that during a pitching lesson, one of my hitting instructors uses one of those tennis ball throwers for dogs to get me to a flatter bat angle but I don’t know anything about one for pitching?


#8

The dx is in, my son tore cartliage in his shoulder.

This is the official dx. Thickening and increased signal intensity of the posterior labrum, suggesting granulation tissue or scarring in the setting of chronic tear. There is associated mild periosteal elevation along the posterior glenoid. The constellation of finding most likely represents chronic repetitive injury in the spectrum of a posterior peel-back lesion

My son is in physical therapy, likely will need surgery when he is older. Most likely we will not be pitching anymore.


#9

I suspect it’s a series of dowel drills. I have a video I’ll try to post …


#10

[quote=“Jasong915”]The dx is in, my son tore cartliage in his shoulder.

This is the official dx. Thickening and increased signal intensity of the posterior labrum, suggesting granulation tissue or scarring in the setting of chronic tear. There is associated mild periosteal elevation along the posterior glenoid. The constellation of finding most likely represents chronic repetitive injury in the spectrum of a posterior peel-back lesion

My son is in physical therapy, likely will need surgery when he is older. Most likely we will not be pitching anymore.[/quote]
Sorry to hear that. Don’t give up. Modern medicine and rest can do wonders.

If you’re up to it, I’d be interested in hearing about your son’s pitching experience, such as: How long has he been pitching? How long has he had formal instruction? How many months out of the year did he pitch? How many leagues did he play in each year? Did he play other sports?

Thanks.


#11

Jasong915, that really blows, what other positions does he play? Hopefully this doesn’t finish him as a baseball player or did all he want to do is pitch?

I have never been a fan of the towel drills or if the “stick” is similar, seems to change natural arm angles and actions by wanting the thing to do an predetermined action that isn’t necessarily how the individual might throw. how many pitchers absolutely throw over the top and then allow the action of the towel drill to work properly.


#12

[quote=“buwhite”]
I have never been a fan of the towel drills or if the “stick” is similar, seems to change natural arm angles and actions by wanting the thing to do an predetermined action that isn’t necessarily how the individual might throw. how many pitchers absolutely throw over the top and then allow the action of the towel drill to work properly.[/quote]

Properly executed the towell drill can be effective from any arm angle, not just over-the-top. The main intent is to allow a player to practice their mechanics without the repeated stresses of throwing a baseball.


#13

I have seen it used before where my kid hits and kids that I see throw with 3/4 or lower arm angles are forced to bring the towel straight down and over the top and touch the ground in front of them. Just my observations but with the proper instructor maybe it’s use is very positive.


#14

Thanks for all the replies. My son is doing well. He just finished up 4 weeks of physical therapy. He has regained some of his range of motion. The Doc re evaluated him and he ordered another 4 weeks of therapy with an additional day added.

My son loves pitching. I personally did not want him to pitch but he was so focused I allowed it. The thing is my son is 10, 5ft 6in and was able to throw very fast. He first started playing when he was 9, he showed no interest in baseball and was focused on football. He played in 2009 fall league which was not very competitive and pitched once a week for one or two innings maybe about 30 pitches. In the summer he played on two teams but only really pitched for one team. He also plays first and third.

My son asked me if he could start throwing left handed. We asked the doc and he saw no problem with it. He is currently working very hard learning to throw as a lefty. He is focusing on using his entire body to throw v just his arm. Any advice?

I was not able to remember the name of the “sticks” but yes they are dowel sticks. I do not think these drills caused he injury as the MRI revealed there was scar tissue. So he had the injury before and it healed. I think it may have happened when he was in football. He also broke his elbow when he was 4 and it needed pins because it was not healing.

The doc also mentioned that he is growing to fast and his ligaments and growth plates are not able to sustain the stress he puts on his body.

Thanks again everyone, I will keep you all posted


#15

:frowning:
I’ve heard that you should stop pitching as soon
as you feel pain in your arm.


#16

a young pitcher should never throw through pain. that is a specialized thing professional pitchers do under strict supervision. the injury you describe in your original post is strange. if the pain is from the bottom of the shoulder (where the biceps and triceps and deltoid meet, and down toward the elbow, there is no connective tissue there that gets permanent injury. i don’t think i understand where the pain is.


#17

He had my son doing a lot of drills. They use a “stick” that he whips. He has my son go through his pitching motion step by step, once he shows proper mechanics he finishes with the stick. (not sure if I’m explaining it right). He has been doing this for a few weeks with no problems. My son began throwing and was throwing harder than I’d ever seen. After they finished he complained his arm was sore and we shut him down.

I think the problem was made worse while he was in school. He told the PE coach his arm was sore but the coach made him do push ups and other things. We got a DR note so he is excused from PE. Hopefully rest will be the remedy.

One question. Should I ice or apply heat? It has been about 9 days since the soreness began[/quote]
The time that icing is important is when you have actually injured yourself, and that should only be just ice the first 48 hours. Ifk it is an injury you should avoid heat for the first 48 hours, after that, intermix them with stretching and the like. Running will also do some good as it will increase the blood flow. Also maybe massage the arm, but do not isolate the one area of the arm when massaging it. Still treat the arm as a whole.