1 Year Later, Updated Mechanics and Video Critiques Please

I had posted some videos last year around this time, this thread http://www.letstalkpitching.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=1881

I’ve attempted to work with the advice I received in that thread as well as hours and hours and hours of reading both books house/ryan and studying mechanics of other pitchers. I’ve also gone through a battle with the UCL which I am attributing to far too many innings and pitching on a bad ankle for 2-3 months.

My main goals were to eliminate the pause in the leg kick to stride progression as well as a stronger later hip shoulder rotation while lengthening my stride. I’ve worked a couple times since I’ve been pitching, a couple times during lessons with various pitching coaches as well as on my own to open up my stride a bit as I land 2-4 in to the closed side routinely…but my body just says no so I’m going to accept it for now. I’ve also worked on shortening up my arm action a bit, as I used to be VERY long but I feel a tad stronger/more comfortable now with the shorter/quicker arm action.

Some additional footage.


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Just messed around a bit with taking some stills from each frame of a couple deliveries and put them side to side to check consistency.

http://www.ferraraphoto.com/fastball/

All in All man its really good. If there was one thing maybe that I would tell you it’s to tryand finish inside(to the arm side) of your front leg. That will help you stay a little more balanced and may give you a little more sink on your fastball. It just seemed as though you were falling off to the glove side just a bit. I’m just picking nits though. It’s all pretty sound.

how old are you? What is your velocity? You look around low-mid 80’s to me but that’s just a guess. I like your mechanics, have you ever had any arm problems?

25

82-84 about a year ago while battling tendinitis and a bad back leg.

Only tendinitis in my elbow last year, again I believe it was due to not using my lower half and throwing 120-140 pitches a game for a couple games in a row. I took a couple months off, and just started working out and throwing again first week of Jan.

120-130 pitches has never been a problem in the past, I’ve always been able to throw A LOT and often without any pain (Obvious muscle soreness 24-48 hrs later, with slow warm up and stretching never seemed to effect me), all through high school my teammates were always jealous that I could throw 6-7 innings one day and show up for practice the next day and warm up and play long toss like it was nothing. I’ve also always thrown A LOT, I love to throw…what you see in the videos I do nearly everyday to keep my arm in shape. My delivery has changed obviously, but its generally been very close to what it is now my whole life with just some minor changes. I think this and the fact that I’ve always thrown a lot and kept my arm in good shape have been the biggest keys to staying healthy. When I sprained my ankle and my delivery changed, so did my arm health.

In your first post you mentioned UCL issues and in your last post you mentioned tendinitis. Are these the same issue or different issues? If different, can you explain the UCL issues?

Same issue, I saw a “sports therapy” chiropractor and he said it was medial epicondylitis, said it was basically tendinitis. I’m not sure why I said UCL, I had just read a thread about it but I meant medial epic. It was treated with ultrasound, the electro stimulation thing (I hate it) and good old rest. Being that I’ve never really had arm trouble before this…I hadn’t done much icing as I hadn’t been introduced to it so much…He stressed icing and a couple months of off time.

During that off time is when I dove into researching the importance of getting my arm into shape and keeping it there.

Ok. You also said you felt the arm issues were due to overuse. But we need to make sure you don’t think the issues were in any way related to the advice you got last year and any subsequent adjustments you made.

While I think you look improved over last year, it’s somewhat hard to tell for sure because in the new video you’re throwing on flat ground and there is no dirt mound or pitching rubber to judge against.

Overall, I’d say you could still get more out of your body. And that might take some stress off the arm.

It looks like you have room to start forward sooner. In the new video, it looks like you really don’t start forward until peak of knee lift.

I’m also wondering about your stride length. If you stepped it off in a heel-to-toe manner from front of rubber to tip of toe at foot plant, your stride should be at least 6 of your shoe lengths long. I’m guessing your stride will come up short which means you’ve still got a little left in the tank.

Not at all, I feel the adjustments have taken a good amount of stress off of my arm. I feel the more I can get the rest of my body involved the better.

I’m going to rent out some bullpen time at a local baseball academy this Sunday, I’ll try to get a tripod or something to put the camera on to show the delivery from a raised mound.

[quote=“Roger”]Overall, I’d say you could still get more out of your body. And that might take some stress off the arm.

It looks like you have room to start forward sooner. In the new video, it looks like you really don’t start forward until peak of knee lift.

I’m also wondering about your stride length. If you stepped it off in a heel-to-toe manner from front of rubber to tip of toe at foot plant, your stride should be at least 6 of your shoe lengths long. I’m guessing your stride will come up short which means you’ve still got a little left in the tank.[/quote]

How would you recommend I work on starting forward sooner?

My stride length has always been a tad short in my opinion and I’ve been working pretty diligently to lengthen it, during my bullpen Sunday I’ll take some measurements and find out where things are at. Time to start a list of things to address during the bullpen session :slight_smile:

Thanks for the input, always appreciated.

What you want to do is to get the front hip moving toward home plate sooner than you do currently - like while the knee is still on its way up. I’ve seen guys that have worked with House for a while actually start their hips forward at the same time the stride foot lifts off the ground. It’s doable. But I wouldn’t suggest you try to go that far with it. At least, not initially.

There are a couple things you can do to help you make the adjustment. One is to simply preset the hips. That is, stick the front hip out toward home plate and tilt it up. (Try this from the stretch position.) This puts you in a position to start falling faster the instant you lift your front foot.

Another thing you can do is to use the cross-over stance. Cross your front foot over (in front of) your back foot. Bend your knees if necessary to get your front foot to rest flat on the ground. This puts you in a position where it is easy to lead with your front hip. Keep your head and spine slightly behind the front hip into foot plant.

You can also do the Hershiser drill where you stand with the side of your glove shoulder facing a chain link fence or padded wall. Pivot foot should be about 10"-12" from the fence/wall. Simply lift your knee an push your hip into the wall. Make sure your hip is the first part of your body to touch the fence/wall. This is an easy way to practice getting the hips going early and to get in lots of reps.